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polish for foreigners

08.05.06, 20:32
I'm a teacher of polish language. If you have problems with polish, don't
hesistate to contact with me.


POLISH FOR FOREIGNERS

If you are interested in learning Polish, your search is over!
Try simply communicative method!
Try lesson with very professional, enthusiastic and patient lecteur!

You see that the learning Polish would be not only effective, but also pleasant!


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- I have degrees in Polish philology at Warsaw University and speak English
- I have experience in teaching Polish to foreigners
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  • usenetposts 08.05.06, 20:37
    polishforforeigners napisała:

    > I'm a teacher of polish language. If you have problems with polish, don't
    > hesistate to contact with me.

    OK. Here's my query.

    What would you say were the most important 20 plays written originally in
    Polish that ought to be on the reading list of any foreigner wishing to become
    acquainted with that part of Polish literature?

    I'm looking forward to your response.

    --
    - Uncle Davey's Homepage -
    :: Foreigners Living in Poland Forum
  • polishforforeigners 08.05.06, 21:42
    It depends on your proficiency level. I don't think that reading of literature
    on the lessons is the best way of learning polish. I know more interesting ways
    of learning and without your (English?) language.
  • polishforforeigners 09.05.06, 11:53
    Polish literature is beatiful, but is too hard to know her without long
    studies... Are you interested in learning Polish?

  • usenetposts 09.05.06, 14:44
    polishforforeigners napisała:

    > Polish literature is beatiful, but is too hard to know her without long
    > studies... Are you interested in learning Polish?
    >

    I'm interested in Polish at the literary level. I am not interested in learning
    Polish other than Polish literature with a teacher. I only need a teacher who
    can talk knowledgeably about the literature.

    Which brings me back to my question.

    What 20 plays from Polish literature are the most worth reading in the original?


    Here is a list of 20 plays from the body of English literature which are the
    most worthwhile reading for foreigners, in my opinion:

    1. Christopher Marlowe „Faustus”
    2. William Shakespeare „Hamlet”
    3. William Shakespeare “Romeo and Juliet”
    4. William Shakespeare “Othello”
    5. William Shakespeare “Macbeth”
    6. William Shakespeare “Twelfth Night”
    7. William Congreve “The Way of the World”
    8. Oliver Goldsmith “She stoops to conquer”
    9. Richard Brinsley Sheridan “School for Scandal”
    10. Richard Brinsley Sheridan “The Rivals”
    11. Oscar Wilde “The Importance of being Earnest”
    12. George Bernard Shaw “Pygmalion”
    13. George Bernard Shaw “Arms and the Man”
    14. John Millington Synge “The Playboy of the Western World”
    15. Tennessee Williams “A Street-car named Desire”
    16. Tennessee Williams “The Glass Menagerie”
    17. Eugene O Neill “Long Day’s Journey into Night”
    18. John Osbourne “Look Back in Anger”
    19. Tom Stoppard “Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are dead”
    20. Harold Pinter “The Birthday Party”

    Here is a similar list for the German language and its top 20 plays:

    1. Gotthold Ephraim Lessing “Nathan der Weise”
    2. Johann Wolfgang Goethe “Faust” (part 1 and/or 2)
    3. Friedrich Schiller “Die Räuber”
    4. Friedrich Schiller “Don Carlos”
    5. Friedrich Schiller “Wilhelm Tell”
    6. Heinrich von Kleist “Der zerbrochne Krug”
    7. Heinrich von Kleist „Das Käthchen von Heilbronn“
    8. Christian Dietrich Grabbe „Scherz, Satire, Ironie und tiefere Bedeutung“
    9. Johann Nestroy „Der Zerrissene“
    10. Georg Büchner „Dantons Tod“
    11. Friedrich Hebbel „Maria Magdalene“
    12. Franz Grillparzer „Wehe dem, der lügt“
    13. Gerhart Hauptmann „Die Weber“
    14. Gerhart Hauptmann „Der Biberpelz“
    15. Bertholt Brecht „Die Dreigroschenoper“
    16. Bertholt Brecht „Leben des Galilei“
    17. Max Frisch „Biedermann und die Brandstifter“
    18. Max Frisch „Andorra“
    19. Friedrich Dürrenmatt „Der Besuch der alten Dame“
    20. Friedrich Dürrenmatt „Die Physiker“

    Now please, as a teacher of the Polish language, provide the same list for
    Polish. That is what I am asking for from you.


    --
    - Uncle Davey's Homepage -
    :: Foreigners Living in Poland Forum
  • minimus 09.05.06, 14:49
    So, if you don't mind, I'll start:
    1. Adam Mickiewicz: Pan Tadeusz
  • usenetposts 09.05.06, 15:46
    minimus napisał:

    > So, if you don't mind, I'll start:

    Sure, I'm happy to throw it open to the floor. It looks like our Polish teacher
    could do with a bit of help with it, frankly speaking.

    > 1. Adam Mickiewicz: Pan Tadeusz

    Good choice.
    --
    - Uncle Davey's Homepage -
    :: Foreigners Living in Poland Forum
  • nasza_maggie 09.05.06, 15:48
    Can I add Tango by Mrożek???
    --
    All dogs go to heaven...
  • nasza_maggie 09.05.06, 15:52
    And Sienkiewiczs Trilogy?

    --
    All dogs go to heaven...
  • nasza_maggie 09.05.06, 15:56
    Also I love Miłosz and most of his work is translated already.
    --
    All dogs go to heaven...
  • minimus 09.05.06, 15:56
    Sienkiewicz would probably not be that good for brushing up the lingo skills.
    More to understand why PIS is so popular.
  • nasza_maggie 09.05.06, 16:01
    Maybe not lingo skills but if you were to read it in English it would be fun.
    Although I'm not sure if as much fun as in the original.
    However I've not come across any translations of late.

    I had 'Pan Tadeusz' in English but I had to return it. It was very good and
    gave the feeling of the original, which was a surprise to me.


    Lets not mix politics with nice stuffsmile
    --
    All dogs go to heaven...
  • nasza_maggie 09.05.06, 16:06
    usenetposts napisał:

    > The thing about Sienkiewicz is - I'm not sure he wrote any plays. This time
    we
    > are on about plays as a literary form.
    >
    > Did Sienkiewicz and Milosz write plays?
    >
    >

    Well im sure theyre much easier for foreigners than Witkacy and Gombrowiczsmile
    --
    All dogs go to heaven...
  • nasza_maggie 09.05.06, 16:09
    And Pan Tadeusz is considered to be easier to perform, as there aren't so many
    battle scenes in itsmile)))))))))
    Otherwise I'm sure the trilogy would be equally as frequently staged smile)))))))))

    Add ZEmsta by Fredro
    --
    All dogs go to heaven...
  • usenetposts 09.05.06, 15:58
    nasza_maggie napisała:

    > Can I add Tango by Mrożek???

    Sure.

    1. Adam Mickiewicz "Pan Tadeusz"
    2. Slawomir Mrożek "Tango"

    I might move that down the list later as in the English and German lists the
    living authors are in the second half.

    The lists do have more than one play per good playwright, so you could
    have "Policja" as well, if you rate it as one of the top twenty Polish plays...

    --
    - Uncle Davey's Homepage -
    :: Foreigners Living in Poland Forum
  • usenetposts 09.05.06, 22:11
    usenetposts napisał:

    > polishforforeigners napisała:
    >
    > > Polish literature is beatiful, but is too hard to know her without long
    > > studies... Are you interested in learning Polish?
    > >
    >
    > I'm interested in Polish at the literary level. I am not interested in
    learning
    >
    > Polish other than Polish literature with a teacher. I only need a teacher who
    > can talk knowledgeably about the literature.
    >
    > Which brings me back to my question.
    >
    > What 20 plays from Polish literature are the most worth reading in the
    original
    > ?
    >
    >
    > Here is a list of 20 plays from the body of English literature which are the
    > most worthwhile reading for foreigners, in my opinion:

    <snip English and German lists, as you can see them below>

    > Now please, as a teacher of the Polish language, provide the same list for
    > Polish. That is what I am asking for from you.
    >

    Well, polishforforeigners?

    We've got, so far, "Pan Tadeusz" and "Tango", so there are only 18 to go.

    Please outline the top Polish plays. It will be your free trial lesson.

    --
    - Uncle Davey's Homepage -
    :: Foreigners Living in Poland Forum
  • nasza_maggie 09.05.06, 16:03

    >
    > What would you say were the most important 20 plays written originally in
    > Polish that ought to be on the reading list of any foreigner wishing to
    become
    > acquainted with that part of Polish literature?
    >
    > I'm looking forward to your response.




    Hmmm do you mean in Polish or translated...??



    --
    All dogs go to heaven...
  • usenetposts 09.05.06, 16:14
    nasza_maggie napisała:

    >
    > >
    > > What would you say were the most important 20 plays written originally in
    >
    > > Polish that ought to be on the reading list of any foreigner wishing to
    > become
    > > acquainted with that part of Polish literature?
    > >
    > > I'm looking forward to your response.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > Hmmm do you mean in Polish or translated...??
    >

    Written in Polish originally. I left Beckett's "Waiting for Godot" out of the
    English list as it was backtranslated from the French by the author.

    That having been said, the theme does not need to be originally Polish. The
    themes taken by Shakespeare are sometimes from Renaissance Italy or from
    classical histories where English was not spoken, but his work became part of
    English literature and is original in the English tongue. If we were looking at
    novels, I would not discount from Polish literature "Faraon" or "Quo Vadis"
    because Prus and Sienky were looking at ancient themes, but anything form
    Conrad I would discount, as he used the English tongue and contributed to
    English literature.

    And just as my list for English contains several Americans and the German one
    some swiss and Austrian, I use the term Polish to determine the language, so
    Czeslaw Milosz is still writing Polish literature subsequent to his
    naturalisation as a US citizen.

    --
    - Uncle Davey's Homepage -
    :: Foreigners Living in Poland Forum
  • nasza_maggie 09.05.06, 16:18

    > And just as my list for English contains several Americans and the German one
    > some swiss and Austrian, I use the term Polish to determine the language, so
    > Czeslaw Milosz is still writing Polish literature subsequent to his
    > naturalisation as a US citizen.
    >
    WAS, he passed away and is burried in Kraków with other honorary POles.

    --
    All dogs go to heaven...
  • usenetposts 09.05.06, 16:31
    nasza_maggie napisała:

    >
    > > And just as my list for English contains several Americans and the German
    > one
    > > some swiss and Austrian, I use the term Polish to determine the language,
    > so
    > > Czeslaw Milosz is still writing Polish literature subsequent to his
    > > naturalisation as a US citizen.
    > >
    > WAS, he passed away and is burried in Kraków with other honorary POles.
    >

    True, I didn't phrase that very well. I meant that his post-naturalisation work
    is still Polish literature.

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    - Uncle Davey's Homepage -
    :: Foreigners Living in Poland Forum
  • kylie1 09.05.06, 23:54
    Don't you find it odd that someone who claims to have studies Polish is
    strangely stumped for words and unable to mention just a couple of names?

    Adam Mickiewicz
    Ignacy Krasicki
    Juliusz Slowacki, etc


    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polish_literature
    strange.....

  • usenetposts 10.05.06, 00:17
    kylie1 napisała:

    > Don't you find it odd that someone who claims to have studies Polish is
    > strangely stumped for words and unable to mention just a couple of names?
    >
    > Adam Mickiewicz
    > Ignacy Krasicki
    > Juliusz Slowacki, etc
    >
    >
    > en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polish_literature
    > strange.....

    To be honest, Kylie, it OUGHT to be strange that someone setting themselves up
    as a teacher of Polish to foreigners, and therefore making themselves out to be
    an ambassador of Polish culture, is at a lost to mention these names, but in
    fact it's par for the course.

    Unfortunately, I'm not in the least surprised by it. In fact, I would have been
    a lot more surprised if the person advertising their services had actually been
    able to answer the question.

    --
    - Uncle Davey's Homepage -
    :: Foreigners Living in Poland Forum
  • sobieski010 10.05.06, 10:58
    On the other hand I went to university in Antwerp and Leuven, and I could not
    really name any famous play in Flemish / Dutch literature.
    But I studied history and not literature, maybe that's why.
  • usenetposts 10.05.06, 19:05
    sobieski010 napisał:

    > On the other hand I went to university in Antwerp and Leuven, and I could not
    > really name any famous play in Flemish / Dutch literature.
    > But I studied history and not literature, maybe that's why.

    The Dutch language has little notable literature full stop. It's as if you guys
    had to pay for those marvellous painters by not having something else. There
    are a few half decent poets and novelists, but very little in the way of works
    for the stage. For your information your greatest play is often reputed to
    be "Palamedes" by Joost van den Vondel, but Shakespeare's ghost is not exactly
    tearing his hair out with envy. A second Vondel play "Lucifer" is also said to
    be of lasting value.

    Don't feel bad. It's not a big country, so nobody expects the Spanish
    Inquisition. In fact, it may well even be their fault that there isn't more in
    the way of literature from the Low Countries, since they had their reign of
    terror there for a good while.

    --
    - Uncle Davey's Homepage -
    :: Foreigners Living in Poland Forum
  • russh 10.05.06, 13:14
    Hi Dave, I'm back after a little rest. Hope you guys are all well.

    What does your query have to do with the learning of the language? Is it just a
    wind-up (I think yes), or do you really think it is important to learn about the
    literature of a language in order to be competent in that language.
  • usenetposts 12.05.06, 10:51
    What about Lilla Weneda? Who wrote that? Doesn't anybody rate it? I thought it
    had a restaurant named after it in the Marriott?

    Are there any restaurants named after Shakespeare plays?

    That could be quite a good idea for a chain of eateries.

    --
    - Uncle Davey's Homepage -
    :: Foreigners Living in Poland Forum
  • ianek70 14.05.06, 13:51
    usenetposts napisał:

    > Are there any restaurants named after Shakespeare plays?
    >
    > That could be quite a good idea for a chain of eateries.

    "The Pizza Merchant of Venice"
  • usenetposts 14.05.06, 15:01
    ianek70 napisał:

    > usenetposts napisał:
    >
    > > Are there any restaurants named after Shakespeare plays?
    > >
    > > That could be quite a good idea for a chain of eateries.
    >
    > "The Pizza Merchant of Venice"

    That would be a good play to name a hamburger joint by.

    It would give whole new overtones to the "quarter pounder"!

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    - Uncle Davey's Homepage -
    :: Foreigners Living in Poland Forum
  • ja_karola 18.05.06, 16:50
    Juliusz Slowacki
  • ja_karola 18.05.06, 21:49
    Sorry. "Lilla Weneda" - Juliusz Slowacki.
  • usenetposts 19.05.06, 00:36
    ja_karola napisała:

    > Sorry. "Lilla Weneda" - Juliusz Slowacki.

    Thanks for that. I'll call that number 4. It would be good to have 6 more even
    if we cannot find 16 more.

    After all, this is a big and significant country, and was even more so
    relatively to other parts of Europe in the past.

    --
    - Uncle Davey's Homepage -
    :: Foreigners Living in Poland Forum
  • usenetposts 10.05.06, 18:53
    russh napisał:

    > Hi Dave, I'm back after a little rest. Hope you guys are all well.
    >
    > What does your query have to do with the learning of the language? Is it just
    a
    > wind-up (I think yes), or do you really think it is important to learn about
    th
    > e
    > literature of a language in order to be competent in that language.


    I'm not saying that it is devoid of an element of wind-up. After all, you know
    me. But in this case it's 10% wind-up, and 90% serious.

    Think about it, in our UK system, at least traditionally, you wouldn't have
    literature coming in at O level, but at A level you would, in our day and in
    the better schools still today, have four short set texts from the literature
    of the language. You also get topic-related projects, and these became more
    fashionable and squeezed out the traditional literary approach to perfecting
    the language in the GCSE highers and in the redbrick universities.

    It still is the case that there is no better way than reading the literature to
    get an advanced level knowledge of the language. The grammar book and
    dictionary will only take you so far.

    I once taught German to a retired lady, by the way. I started after I left
    school in July and stopped when I left for Berlin on my year out in March. By
    Christmas she had started literature and by March we were half way through
    Heinrich Heine's Buch der Lieder.

    And at the end of the day I don't need a teacher to explain to me the nuts and
    bolts of the language - that's a memory game of patience that I need to play on
    my own and a teacher only gets in the way. But someone to share and discuss the
    literature with - someone who understands the culture and appreciates it and
    can talk knowledgeably about the background: for me that's worth paying for.

    --
    - Uncle Davey's Homepage -
    :: Foreigners Living in Poland Forum
  • russh 18.05.06, 22:38
    > Think about it, in our UK system, at least traditionally, you wouldn't have
    > literature coming in at O level, but at A level you would, in our day and in
    > the better schools still today, have four short set texts from the literature
    > of the language. You also get topic-related projects, and these became more
    > fashionable and squeezed out the traditional literary approach to perfecting
    > the language in the GCSE highers and in the redbrick universities.

    In my day O-Level English came in two forms - English, and English Literature.
    For the Literature O-Level, we had 'A Midsummer Nights Dream' and 'To Kill A
    Mockingbird', although for the two years we went through many of Shakespears
    works, plus Orwell and Bernard Shaw. I never took English at 'A' level.


    > It still is the case that there is no better way than reading the literature to
    >
    > get an advanced level knowledge of the language. The grammar book and
    > dictionary will only take you so far.

    Reading can also include newspapers etc. In my lessons I often take articles and
    use them, especially if the article is of international interest. This can also
    give you a more advanced knowledge of the language.

    > But someone to share and discuss the
    >
    > literature with - someone who understands the culture and appreciates it and
    > can talk knowledgeably about the background: for me that's worth paying for.

    Language is only a part of the culture of a country, although important. It is
    very useful when trying to understand a country's culture.

    To me, what you are wanting of a teacher is not to teach you the language (you
    are probably too competent or talented a linguist to need one, at least until an
    advanced level), but to help you understand the people and their culture. This,
    in my book, is something a little different, although related.

  • usenetposts 19.05.06, 00:34
    russh napisał:

    > > Think about it, in our UK system, at least traditionally, you wouldn't ha
    > ve
    > > literature coming in at O level, but at A level you would, in our day and
    > in
    > > the better schools still today, have four short set texts from the litera
    > ture
    > > of the language. You also get topic-related projects, and these became mo
    > re
    > > fashionable and squeezed out the traditional literary approach to perfect
    > ing
    > > the language in the GCSE highers and in the redbrick universities.
    >
    > In my day O-Level English came in two forms - English, and English Literature.
    > For the Literature O-Level, we had 'A Midsummer Nights Dream' and 'To Kill A
    > Mockingbird', although for the two years we went through many of Shakespears
    > works, plus Orwell and Bernard Shaw. I never took English at 'A' level.

    I did. I have an English A level, and you cannot do it without literature.

    These days most people only go into detail on Shakespeare at A level, not much
    at O level. In my day I had the Pardoner's Tale by Chaucer in Middle English,
    and that was probably the most challenging piece of literature. We did not have
    anything earlier than Chaucer - I only went back to true Old English at degree
    level, as one paper was in comparative Germanic Philology. The set texts were
    the ones in the standard anthology by Sweet, published by the OUP. In the exam
    you had to be able to translate any page out of that book into Modern English,
    so you had better have studied the whole thing. If you did, they were the easy
    marks on the day.

    > > It still is the case that there is no better way than reading the literat
    > ure to
    > >
    > > get an advanced level knowledge of the language. The grammar book and
    > > dictionary will only take you so far.
    >
    > Reading can also include newspapers etc. In my lessons I often take articles
    an
    > d
    > use them, especially if the article is of international interest. This can
    also
    > give you a more advanced knowledge of the language.
    >

    Agreed. But the one does not exclude the other, and whereas newspaper articles
    are much of a muchness, the landmarks of a country's literature help to define
    its national consciousness, and transnational consciousness. The fact that we
    share Shakespeare with the entire English speaking world is worth more,in fact,
    than any formalised "Commonwealth" or any "special relationship" based on
    ancient politicians being able to "do business" with each other.

    > > But someone to share and discuss the
    > >
    > > literature with - someone who understands the culture and appreciates it
    > and
    > > can talk knowledgeably about the background: for me that's worth paying f
    > or.
    >
    > Language is only a part of the culture of a country, although important. It is
    > very useful when trying to understand a country's culture.
    >
    > To me, what you are wanting of a teacher is not to teach you the language (you
    > are probably too competent or talented a linguist to need one, at least until
    a
    > n
    > advanced level), but to help you understand the people and their culture.
    This,
    > in my book, is something a little different, although related.
    >

    I think of it all time as O level, A level. Newspapers are of course good for
    developing certain useful applications of the language, but they are ephemeral
    in character, unchallenging as they use many international words, are often
    badly written. No-one will remember these articles in twenty years time. I did
    articles at O level, but do you think I remember a single one? Are there are
    sentences in them worth memorising and laying to one's heart? Hardly!

    Now a Polish teacher to Poles would not be given the job pf "Pan/i od
    polskiego" if they did not know their literature, the way this person appears
    not to have known. If this person is not deemed good enough by her own people
    to teach Polish to them, then I don't think she's good enough to teach Polish
    to me either.

    I am now in the market for a mandarin native speaker, preferably form Beijing,
    who can help me with my Mandarin. I would expact that person to know
    Zhongguowei in both the simplified PRC and the Tainwanese full editions, as
    well as Pinyin, and also to be able to assist me to the simpler end of Tang
    Poetry and the Analects of Confucius in the original.

    --
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  • ja_karola 19.05.06, 02:38

    Let me come to the rescue usenetposts and provide you with an introductory
    course on Polish theater. First off however, let me tell you that Polish
    literature is one of the richest in the world although I’ll understand
    accusations of bias given that I am Polish. You may wish to know that our
    culture was for many centuries our only means of survival as a nation therefore
    many classical works (e.g., the aforementioned Trilogy) were created while
    Poland did not exist as a country. But let me stick to plays only, especially
    since so many of you had wrongfully listed poems, novels, and historical epics
    on the so called list.

    Let’s start with the Great Polish Trio who are:

    Adam Mickiewicz
    Zygmunt Krasinski and
    Juliusz Slowacki

    Their works include:

    Adam Mickiewicz:”Dziady” („Forefathers’ Eve”wink, „Ksiegi Narodu Polskiego”.
    By the way, „Pan Tadeusz”, whose excerpts are required to be learned by heart
    in our schools, is one hell of a long poem but NOT a play.

    Juliusz Slowacki:”Lilla Weneda”,”Mazepa, „Fantazy”, ”Sen srebrny
    Salomei”, ”Maria Stuart” (or the beloved Scottish Mary
    Stuart), ”Kordian”, ”Horsztynski” and of course „Balladyna”. Slowacki wrote 14
    plays in all. I’m simply listing the most popular productions.

    Zygmunt Krasinski: „Nie-Boska Komedia” and „Irydion” – he wrote mostly poems as
    well, but these two are his unforgettable plays.

    Cyprian Kamil Norwid, as the ones above, is part of the period of Romanticism.
    His works include „Pierscien wielkiej damy”, ”Noc tysieczna
    druga”, ”Kleopatra i Cezar”, ”Krakus”, „Za kulisami”. Unfortunately his genius
    was only recognized after his premature death.

    Now let’s move on to the remaining great Polish authors.

    Aleksander Fredro – the master of Polish comedy and also known as the Polish
    Molière, wrote „Sluby panienskie”, „Pan Jowialski”, ”Damy i huzary”, „Maz i
    zona”. ”Zemsta” (or “Vengeance) is already on your list and a great play (you
    may want to rent Polanski’s recent version – great actors and English subtitles
    available).

    Stanislaw Wyspianski , Stanislaw Ignacy Witkiewicz (Witkacy), Witold
    Gombrowicz – chief exponents of the Polish avant-garde (late 19th and early
    20th century).

    Wyspianski: his ideological trilogy: „Wesele” („The Wedding”wink, “Wyzwolenie” (
    or Liberation) and „Akropolis”. He also wrote Hamlet (a paraphrase of the
    Shakespearean drama). Also well known are his „Warszawianka” and „Noc
    listopadowa” (November night).

    Witkacy: „Matka” (Mother), „Szewcy”, „Wariat i zakonnica”, ”W malym
    dworku”, ”Jan Karol Maciej Wscieklica”.

    Witold Gombrowicz: „Slub”- play partly written in poem-form.
    Gabriela Zapolska - the satirical comedies of manners „Moralnosc Pani
    Dulskiej”cryingthe most famous),”Zabusia”,”Ich czworo”,”Panna Maliczewska”.

    Modern play writers include:

    Slawomir Mrozek whose plays are now considered as comedy classics. The
    important plays he created are “The Police”, ”The Turkey”, ”Karol” and “The
    Game”. His most famous is “Tango” (also already on your list) and “The
    Emmigrants”, Mrozek’s second most often produced play after “Tango”.
    Janusz Glowacki: “Kopciuch”, “Polowanie na karaluchy”,”Antygona w Nowym Jorku”.
    The two former being produced on Broadway in New York.

    Tadeusz Rozewicz; „Pulapka”, ”Kartoteka” - translated into 20 languages.

    Edward Redlinski: ”Awans”

    Jerzy Szaniawski: ”Dwa Teatry”.

    Leon Kruczkowski: „Niemcy”

    Tadeusz Kantor: of utmost importance to the Polish theatre. The creator of
    the “theatre of death” movement or rather school. He’s considered to be one of
    the most significant artists and thinkers of the second half of the 20th
    century on the international scene.
    He created ”Umarla klasa”, „Wielopole,Wielopole”, „Niech szczezna artysci”.

    Adolf Nowaczynski: „Wielki Fryderyk”

    Bruno Jasienski :”Bal manekinow”crying„The mannequins’ ball”wink

    Karol Wojtyla ”Przed sklepem jubilera” – let’s not forget our Pope whose plays
    are praised for their philosophical aspects and deep social commentaries.

    Miron Bialoszewski: „Pani Koch”, „Szury”


    I believe to have listed 21 writers and many of their works. If you are truly
    interested in Polish literature, I don’t think you will find it difficult to
    dive into reading. Should the language prove an obstacle, you’ll be happy to
    know that most of the above-mentioned plays were translated into many
    languages, and most certainly English.

    If you’re a true aficionado, you may be interested to know that every Thursday
    you can see a Polish play on the TV Polonia channel, a habit I’ve developed
    over the years. I live in Montreal yet find it rather easy to stay in touch
    with the rich Polish culture.

    All the best learning Polish, which by the way, has been documented as one of
    the richest albeit difficult languages in the world. Hope you find a good
    teacher……


    P.S. Jossif Brodsky, a poet and Nobel laureate, expressed his awe for Polish
    poetry when he said that it is the richest, strongest and most beautiful he has
    ever come across….. but I digress. Let’s leave poetry for another time.




  • babiana 20.05.06, 18:22
    Thanks; I appreciate it! I made an effort...
  • ja_karola 20.05.06, 18:27
    Ooops! Sorry...the above message actually originated from me, but my computer
    was logged in under another user when I sat down to respond.

    Anyway...

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