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Polish for foreigners

31.12.06, 11:54
Polish language isn’t difficult – try to learn with me! I’m an experienced teacher of foreign languages: English and German, as well as Polish for foreigners. Now I’m a PhD student (Adam Mickiewicz University, The Faculty of Polish and Classic Philology). I offer you lessons in Polish, for beginners also in English and German. Without leaving your house/office, losing no time and money for transport, I’ll come to the place you decide to have lessons (in Poznań), with no extra charge. I hope you will conntact me soon! My telephone number is 509157648
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  • jopelka 02.01.07, 09:55
    It depends on this what you want to know about my classes.
  • waldek1610 02.01.07, 10:14
    You didn't get the point. He ment to imply that "Foreigners living in Poland
    forum" is a place where you can take part in our discussions, and not a place
    where slap the advertisment on for free....

    Why is that, that the only thing people in Poland care about is money? smile



  • usenetposts 03.01.07, 01:25
    waldek1610 napisał:

    > You didn't get the point. He ment to imply that "Foreigners living in Poland
    > forum" is a place where you can take part in our discussions, and not a place
    > where slap the advertisment on for free....
    >
    > Why is that, that the only thing people in Poland care about is money? smile

    I think it's related to the sad fact that you can't buy things without it.

    I don't mind people sharing info about their services as long as that's not all
    they do here. You have to buy the right to advertise on here by either stumping
    up 30 PLN for a link to GW, as they have a right to get something back for the
    space we use, or else buy the right to tout the services in discussion by
    actualy adding something to the discussion. I see Ianek's given a good opener
    and I hope this person will take the chance and join in properly.

    If people limit themselves to spamming, without adding any proper
    participation, then there is a button I have that I can use on them, and I'm
    quite prepared to do so.

    --
    - Uncle Davey's Homepage -
    :: Foreigners Living in Poland Forum
  • ianek70 02.01.07, 14:53
    jopelka napisała:

    > Polish language isn’t difficult – try to learn with me!

    So what's the difference between poczekać and zaczekać?
  • minimus 03.01.07, 10:19
    according to the KISS principle - none
  • jopelka 03.01.07, 10:57
    According to the PWN's dictionary the difference between poczekać and zaczekać is like here:
    poczekać - wait for somebody or something for some time (poczekać na + Acc., kogo, co.
    e.g. Nie przejmuj się, poczekam na ciebie
    zaczekać - stop somewhere while waiting for some time (e.g.zaczekać w hotelu, w domu).
    Zaczekam w hotelu.
    But I think Polish people use zaczekać in the same meaning as poczekać, e.g. Zaczekam na ciebie.

    By the way if anybody has some problem with Polish language I'll try to help. For free!
  • varsovian 03.01.07, 12:50
    Ever considered a future with Trivial Pursuits?
  • usenetposts 05.01.07, 00:40
    jopelka napisała:

    > According to the PWN's dictionary the difference between poczekać and
    zaczekać
    > is like here:
    > poczekać - wait for somebody or something for some time (poczekać na + Acc.,
    ko
    > go, co.
    > e.g. Nie przejmuj się, poczekam na ciebie
    > zaczekać - stop somewhere while waiting for some time (e.g.zaczekać w hotelu,
    w
    > domu).
    > Zaczekam w hotelu.
    > But I think Polish people use zaczekać in the same meaning as poczekać, e.g.
    Za
    > czekam na ciebie.
    >
    > By the way if anybody has some problem with Polish language I'll try to help.
    F
    > or free!

    OK, that's more like it. I'll give you an official "wracam honor" in that case.

    My query is as follows:

    I would like to say in Polish "the children come from very different
    backgrounds" now I can say "dzieci te pochodzą z bardzo różnych" and then I
    have the problem. Tło is the nominative singular, so if "okno" gives gen.
    plural "okien" (cf. "dzieci te wypadały z bardzo różnych okien") then it stands
    to reason that the form must be "tieł". They said "that's not right" but when I
    asked what was the right form, they shook their heads and said "nie powiem
    Panu". Well, I never thought it was a state secret, but in these days of
    Wildibronsztein and Lustracja and what have you, no doubt you need to be
    careful what you tell foreigners.

    Perhaps you will be able to put me straight on the genitive plural of "tło"?

    --
    - Uncle Davey's Homepage -
    :: Foreigners Living in Poland Forum
  • marcus_anglikiem 05.01.07, 00:51
    Perhaps you will be able to put me straight on the genitive plural of "tło"?

    Dave, I'm honoured to be of service: the gen. pl. of "tło" is "teł".

    nb. the reason it is "teł" whilst gen. pl. of ok-no is "ok-ien" is that "k" is
    one of those consonants that likes to have an "i" in front of it - i believe
    they are referred to as "soft consonants", whilst "t" is not.
  • marcus_anglikiem 05.01.07, 11:35
    thanks! - that's why we say "zabiłem go młotem" ale "zabiłem go młokiem" wink

    ... on the subject of word usage, i too wondered about the usage... i too
    thought of "pochodzenia", though i think "życiorysy" sounds good.
  • marcus_anglikiem 05.01.07, 11:36
    marcus_anglikiem napisał:

    > thanks! - that's why we say "zabiłem go młotem" ale "zabiłem go młokiem" wink

    ... tongue_out i missed the "t" out didn't i !
  • marcus_anglikiem 05.01.07, 11:42
    ...z różnych środowisk... (?)
  • mafketis 05.01.07, 12:03
    > ...z różnych środowisk... (?)

    I considered that but thought it sounds kind of negative, IME środowisko when
    referring to people often refers to illicit activities ... time to turn to the
    fount of all knowledge - Google.

    A very quick, very superficial search suggests that when used of children
    środowisko primarily refers to social class especially lower social class...
  • usenetposts 06.01.07, 18:05
    OK, this is very interesting. But what if I talk about the historical
    background to a certain problem - for example a sentence such as this one:

    "Poland is reluctant to allow a "corridor" linking Belarus to the Kaliningrad
    region, which is understandable given the historical background of the Danzig
    Corridor."

    Would you use "srodowisko" or "tło" for that? Or another word?

    --
    - Uncle Davey's Homepage -
    :: Foreigners Living in Poland Forum
  • minimus 06.01.07, 18:46
    tło smile)
    but don't know why. just sounds good smile
  • mafketis 06.01.07, 18:53
    > "Poland is reluctant to allow a "corridor" linking Belarus to the Kaliningrad
    > region, which is understandable given the historical background of the Danzig
    > Corridor."

    My (very rough, first draft) go at that would be something like:

    Polacy niechętnie dopuszczają do budowy 'korytarza' między Białorusią i
    Kaliningrad, co jest zrozumiałe jeśli weźmie się pod uwagę historię korytarza
    gdańskiego.

    I'd probably drop 'background' altogether and just go with history by itself, or
    maybe 'los korytarza gdańskiego' but again, I'm not a native speaker.
  • marcus_anglikiem 07.01.07, 20:17
    >"Poland is reluctant to allow a "corridor" linking Belarus to the Kaliningrad
    > region, which is understandable given the historical background of the Danzig
    > Corridor."

    albo...

    Polska ma niechęć pozwolić 'korytarz' połączając Belarus z Kaliningradem,
    które zrozumiało jest ze względem historii 'Korytarza Gdańskiego'.
  • usenetposts 08.01.07, 12:55
    OK, I can see getting round it there by omitting it altogether, but what if I
    rephrase it like this:

    "In order to understand Poland's objections to the idea of a Kaliningrad
    corridor, there is a lot of historical background that needs to be taken into
    account"?

    --
    - Uncle Davey's Homepage -
    :: Foreigners Living in Poland Forum
  • marcus_anglikiem 08.01.07, 20:09
    Dave, what's the difference between 'historical background' and 'history'
    (obviously - by the context - that particular 'history' pertaining to the
    subject - i.e. the subject's 'historical background')
  • usenetposts 09.01.07, 12:11
    marcus_anglikiem napisał:

    > Dave, what's the difference between 'historical background' and 'history'
    > (obviously - by the context - that particular 'history' pertaining to the
    > subject - i.e. the subject's 'historical background')

    If I were to write "there is a lot of history we need to understand" then
    backdrop or background may well be understood by the sapient reader. The less
    sapient reader may simply think it is a statement of the obvious, that the area
    has a long history. Most of the time, we have to write bearing in mind the
    possible misunderstandings or misinterpretations that people could have, and
    that is the reason for trying to be as precise as possible in writing. It's
    always a pay-off against brevity, though.

    Some writers love brevity, calling it "the soul of wit", but they sometimes
    take it to extremes, writing almost a kind of shorthand. One sometimes gets the
    impression, when corresponding with these people, that the native speaker of
    English with whom one is corresponding has suddenly turned into a Chinaman, and
    while what they want to say may be obvious to them, it is impossible to get
    there without guesswork when the sentences are limited to five words.

    Someone whom Kylie and I know in another forum likes to write these short
    snappy sentences that seem so pithy, but all she succeeds in doing is getting
    everyone else's hackles up.

    --
    - Uncle Davey's Homepage -
    :: Foreigners Living in Poland Forum
  • mafketis 05.01.07, 07:30
    usenetposts napisał:

    > I would like to say in Polish "the children come from very different
    > backgrounds" now I can say "dzieci te pochodzą z bardzo różnych" and then I
    > have the problem. Tło is the nominative singular,

    I'm not a native speaker, but now that some kind soul has told you the answer,
    I'll mention that tło doesn't seem like the right word, at least I've never seen
    it used in that manner at least. As for what the right word is might depend on
    what you actually mean.

    Off the top of my head, Dzieci mają różne pochodzenia sounds better (I don't
    think 'bardzo' is necessary in such a sentence) but that's more about ethnic
    background (and used about things as well) if you're talking about different
    kinds of life experiences (family, social class, places lived in etc) I might
    think Dzieci mają różne życiorysy (lit. biographies).

    Perhaps a native could enlighten us...

  • minimus 05.01.07, 08:35
    Your absolutely right. Tło does mean background but in for example a picture.
    In the example given by Dave pochodzenie would be most suitable as it implies
    before birth. Życiorys is their own life. Now you tell me what
    does 'background' mean exactly in that sentence. Is it pochodzenie or życiorys?
  • varsovian 05.01.07, 10:11
    family,
    home,
    (social class ...)
  • russh 08.01.07, 22:36

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