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"dyspozycyjny" in English??

IP: proxy / *.chello.pl 04.12.02, 16:46
How would you translate??
Thanks in advance:))
Edytor zaawansowany
  • beciab 04.12.02, 16:49
    Available.
    Disposable? At one's disposal.
  • Gość: brum_brum IP: *.hfx.eastlink.ca 04.12.02, 17:28
    I would say a "Dispatcher"....hopping it works for you !.
    Cheeres....brum_brum

    Gość portalu: ja napisał(a):

    > How would you translate??
    > Thanks in advance:))
  • Gość: ja IP: proxy / *.chello.pl 04.12.02, 17:48
    "dyspozycyjny/a" but regarding flexible work hours:)
    how would you write it in a motivation letter??
  • Gość: brum_brum IP: *.hfx.eastlink.ca 04.12.02, 18:00
    maybe "on call" or "casual supervisior", "part-time dispatcher",
    good luck...brum_brum
  • Gość: brum_brum IP: *.hfx.eastlink.ca 04.12.02, 18:09
    Sorry, I forgot to tell you that the "google" is very useful search engine on
    the internet. There you can find all kinds of pages with explanation of english
    words. Pozdrawiam....brum_brum
  • Gość: ja IP: proxy / *.chello.pl 04.12.02, 18:17
    Thanks brum_brum :))
  • Gość: brum_brum IP: *.hfx.eastlink.ca 06.12.02, 01:09
    My pleasure, ja
    Gość portalu: ja napisał(a):

    > Thanks brum_brum :))
  • Gość: Andy IP: *.acn.pl 04.12.02, 18:24
    1."Thanks in advance" means:"dziekuje z gory"
    2.dispatcher =" dyspozytor" in Polish.
    brgds.
  • Gość: ja IP: proxy / *.chello.pl 04.12.02, 18:38
    Thanks, but it's nothing new;))
  • Gość: guest IP: *.ipt.aol.com 05.12.02, 03:56
    Gość portalu: ja napisał(a):

    > "dyspozycyjny/a" but regarding flexible work hours:)
    > how would you write it in a motivation letter??

    It's a cover or covering letter--there is no such thing as a motivation letter.

    As for the question, "willing to work flexible hours" sounds best to me.
  • Gość: gp IP: *.wadakogyo.co.jp 15.12.02, 23:28
  • Gość: From Evanston IP: *.nuts.northwestern.edu 17.12.02, 06:05
    Thus far, the translation tips regarding the word "dyspozycyjny" have been misleading.
    You cannot (and should not) translate this word into "dispatcher," since "dispatcher" means "dyspozytor," that is one
    who gives directions and directives, a superior, one who commends. By contrast, "dyspozycyjny" refers to one who
    takes directions and directives, one who agrees to be in a subordinated position. Likewise, you cannot (and should
    not) translate the word "dyspozycyjny" into the phrase "at one's disposal." Why? Because this phrase means "w
    czyjejs dyspozycji," a nie "dyspozycyjny." To make this difference clear, I could say, "Joanna has a lot of cash at her
    disposal" ("Joanna ma duzo gotowki do swojej dyspozycji"), which does not mean that she is "dyspozycyjna."
    Moreover, the word "dyspozycyjny" often has a negative connotation. It describes an individual who willingly accepts
    the prospect of being used by somebody else, usually by one's superiors. In the PRL, "dyspozycyjny aparatczyk"
    meant "a party apparatchik who too easily does what his or her superiors wanted him or her to do. If I say, "Joanna
    jest taka dyspozycyjna," I suggest that she eagerly (too eagerly) takes orders from her superiors. To get rid of this
    negative dimension, you should translate "dyspozycyjny" into "flexible" (elastyczny, chcacy i majacy potencjal do
    dostosowania sie do roznych wymogow i okolicznosci, na przyklad w pracy). However, if you want to emphasize
    both one's flexibility and one's ability to take somebody else's orders uncritically, the word "disposable" seems to much
    better. It means "free for use, available" but also carries a sense of moral flexibility.
  • Gość: chickenshorts IP: *.abo.wanadoo.fr 17.12.02, 07:35
    Gość portalu: From Evanston napisał(a):

    > Thus far, the translation tips regarding the word "dyspozycyjny" have been
    misl
    > eading.
    > You cannot (and should not) translate this word into "dispatcher,"
    since "dispa
    > tcher" means "dyspozytor," that is one
    > who gives directions and directives, a superior, one who commends. By
    contrast,
    > "dyspozycyjny" refers to one who
    > takes directions and directives, one who agrees to be in a subordinated
    positio
    > n. Likewise, you cannot (and should
    > not) translate the word "dyspozycyjny" into the phrase "at one's disposal."
    Why
    > ? Because this phrase means "w
    > czyjejs dyspozycji," a nie "dyspozycyjny." To make this difference clear, I
    cou
    > ld say, "Joanna has a lot of cash at her
    > disposal" ("Joanna ma duzo gotowki do swojej dyspozycji"), which does not
    mean
    > that she is "dyspozycyjna."
    > Moreover, the word "dyspozycyjny" often has a negative connotation. It
    describe
    > s an individual who willingly accepts
    > the prospect of being used by somebody else, usually by one's superiors. In
    the
    > PRL, "dyspozycyjny aparatczyk"
    > meant "a party apparatchik who too easily does what his or her superiors
    wanted
    > him or her to do. If I say, "Joanna
    > jest taka dyspozycyjna," I suggest that she eagerly (too eagerly) takes
    orders
    > from her superiors. To get rid of this
    > negative dimension, you should translate "dyspozycyjny" into "flexible"
    (elasty
    > czny, chcacy i majacy potencjal do
    > dostosowania sie do roznych wymogow i okolicznosci, na przyklad w pracy).

    Christ! What a performance! You must be a walking (cycling) Cyclopedia...
    of rather useless knowledge, I'm afraid...


    Howev
    > er, if you want to emphasize
    > both one's flexibility and one's ability to take somebody else's orders
    uncriti
    > cally, the word "disposable" seems to much
    > better. It means "free for use, available" but also carries a sense of moral
    fl
    > exibility.

    Like nappies, right? Or, bin liners, carrier bags...? These show certainly
    great flexibility!
  • Gość: From Evanston IP: *.nuts.northwestern.edu 17.12.02, 08:20
    You cannot be partially pregnant. You either translate a phrase/word correctly or you don't. If you don't, or if you
    follow misleading tips, you risk both being funny and misunderstood, that is, being ridiculous. To sum this up, too much
    unlearned flexibility in the business of translation is like turning yourself into a joke. Good luck with your
    "dyspozycyjny" translated into "dispatcher."
  • Gość: chickenShorts IP: *.abo.wanadoo.fr 17.12.02, 11:51
    Gość portalu: From Evanston napisał(a):

    > You cannot be partially pregnant. You either translate a phrase/word
    correctly
    > or you don't. If you don't, or if you
    > follow misleading tips, you risk both being funny and misunderstood, that is,
    b
    > eing ridiculous. To sum this up, too much
    > unlearned flexibility in the business of translation is like turning yourself
    i
    > nto a joke. Good luck with your
    > "dyspozycyjny" translated into "dispatcher."

    Ha, never have I agreed to a "dispatcher" nor any other "translation tip"
    here, sir, so attributing to me crap and wishing me good lack with it is... a
    criminal offense!
    Should it still matter to the translation, I would rather ask the poster, ja,
    why the hell is he so attached to "dyspozycyjny" - is it the tittle of his work
    position? Like 'zawiadowca'? Otherwise, the word sounds awkward, to say the
    least.
    Anyway, during my twelve years of being surrounded by everyday English, never
    have I heard the adj.'disposable' accompany a person or what the person does, I
    can assure you. Unless with an insult in mind. English 'disposable' is not the
    same as French 'disponible'! Now, having said that, I allow for the use
    of 'disposable' with particular meaning attached in technical jargon and such,
    but I doubt it's applicable here.
    As for pregnancies, I don't really know. Frankly, I can imagine partial
    pregnancy; a phrase begining 'pregnant with meaning', for instance, would allow
    partiality in certain sense of the word and you would be a perfect example of
    this.
  • Gość: Rev. Reverend IP: *.nyc.rr.com 17.12.02, 12:15
    This is getting way too complicated.
    - Mary, are you pregnant?
    - Just a little bit, not much.

    Disposable like disposable camera or disposable razor.
    In everyday english it means throw away camera or throw away razor.
    Stick with flexible.

    On the label it used to read "Discard after use". What the f... they want me
    to do with it? Well, now it reads "Throw away after use". It helps to cut down
    on expletives.
  • Gość: chickenShorts IP: *.abo.wanadoo.fr 17.12.02, 12:58
    Gość portalu: Rev. Reverend napisał(a):

    > This is getting way too complicated.
    > - Mary, are you pregnant?
    > - Just a little bit, not much.

    I thought it went differenly... At least, according to Scriptures.

    - Joseph, pleassse!... Joseph, stop it! I am pregnant!
    - Mary!
    - Oh, no, it's not what you think. It was God!

    Rev, you are a crap Minister!


    > Disposable like disposable camera or disposable razor.
    > In everyday english it means throw away camera or throw away razor.
    > Stick with flexible.
    >
    > On the label it used to read "Discard after use". What the f... they want me
    > to do with it? Well, now it reads "Throw away after use". It helps to cut
    down
    > on expletives.

    Don't cut down on expletives! This forum will die...
  • Gość: From Evanston IP: *.nuts.northwestern.edu 17.12.02, 12:54
    Too much self-confidence usually borders on the grotesque. To make the readers of this forum believe how
    competent you are linguistically you employ a worn-out strategy, namely, the argument ad verecundiam (from
    authority) by saying "during my twelve years of being surrounded by everyday English ... I can assure you." Which is
    intended to suggest that the longer you stay within an English-language environment, the more competent
    language-wise you are. Wrong. I know many folks who you've been immersed in English for decades and they are still
    (linguistically) waterproof. Perhaps that's your case. (Here's my argument ad hominem--yes, a personal attack.) Going
    back do the issue: what I was trying to clarify in my first message was that the Polish adjective "dyspozycyjny" is
    more complex than the suggested "available" (or "flexible" and the like) as its English equivalent. Why? Because the
    former is, at least potentially, ethically offensive (in the Polish language of the PRL, the adjective "dyspozycyjny" meant
    "gotowy sluzyc bezkrytycznie," which meant that if Mr. X was described officially as "dyspozycyjny" he was
    unofficially called "dyspozycyjna szmata"). The English word "available" simply does not have this judgmental
    component. It was in this context that I offered the adjective "disposable" (which is indeed offensive) to incorporate
    into the translated word this ethical dimension of the Polish/PRL original. In short, some sort of cultural (and not
    linguistic) translation was needed. On the other hand, if you strip the word "dyspozycyjny" of its PRL context, then
    fine--you can translate it safely into the word "available" or "flexible," which occurs frequently within a business-like
    environment. Having said that, I am now leaving for good, so you can now go on with making your readers believe
    you're a William Safire of the Wyborcza forum.
  • Gość: chickenShorts IP: *.abo.wanadoo.fr 17.12.02, 13:16
    Gość portalu: From Evanston napisał(a):

    > Too much self-confidence usually borders on the grotesque. To make the
    readers
    > of this forum believe how
    > competent you are linguistically you employ a worn-out strategy, namely, the
    ar
    > gument ad verecundiam (from
    > authority) by saying "during my twelve years of being surrounded by everyday
    En
    > glish ... I can assure you." Which is
    > intended to suggest that the longer you stay within an English-language
    environ
    > ment, the more competent
    > language-wise you are.

    Indeed! But you are wrong to suggest I needed any reader of this forum brain
    washed to have him/her persuaded. It was merely addressed to and intended for
    you. And it's not about me employing wright or wrong vocabulary. It's about you
    and your ridiculous justification of 'disposable' in place of 'disponible'!


    Wrong. I know many folks who you've been immersed in Eng
    > lish for decades and they are still
    > (linguistically) waterproof. Perhaps that's your case. (Here's my argument ad
    h
    > ominem--yes, a personal attack.) Going
    > back do the issue: what I was trying to clarify in my first message was that
    th
    > e Polish adjective "dyspozycyjny" is
    > more complex than the suggested "available" (or "flexible" and the like) as
    its
    > English equivalent. Why? Because the
    > former is, at least potentially, ethically offensive (in the Polish language
    of
    > the PRL, the adjective "dyspozycyjny" meant
    > "gotowy sluzyc bezkrytycznie," which meant that if Mr. X was described
    official
    > ly as "dyspozycyjny" he was
    > unofficially called "dyspozycyjna szmata"). The English word "available"
    simply
    > does not have this judgmental
    > component. It was in this context that I offered the adjective "disposable"
    (wh
    > ich is indeed offensive) to incorporate
    > into the translated word this ethical dimension of the Polish/PRL original.
    In
    > short, some sort of cultural (and not
    > linguistic) translation was needed. On the other hand, if you strip the
    word "d
    > yspozycyjny" of its PRL context,

    For fuck's sake, man, you clearly have a problem!

    then
    > fine--you can translate it safely into the word "available" or "flexible,"
    whic
    > h occurs frequently within a business-like
    > environment. Having said that, I am now leaving for good, so you can now go
    on
    > with making your readers believe
    > you're a William Safire of the Wyborcza forum.

    And you clearly aspire to 'C.Hitchens league'. He famously said
    once that Stalin was a great man, then, when it wasn't safe any more defend
    this stance without risking mental asylum, he tried Lenin... Now, I hear, he is
    close to share a platform with... guess who?
  • Gość: ania IP: *.acn.pl / *.acn.waw.pl 19.12.02, 19:01
    As far as I know you don't say in English ''thanks in advance'' as it sounds
    rather offensive...
  • Gość: chickenShorts IP: *.abo.wanadoo.fr 19.12.02, 19:21
    Gość portalu: ania napisał(a):

    > As far as I know you don't say in English ''thanks in advance'' as it sounds
    > rather offensive...

    Ha, ha...

    But... no, it doesn't!
  • Gość: epifit@wp.pl IP: *.au.poznan.pl 06.01.03, 20:35
    hi, your letter regarding the "flexible" gig really impressed me. Just by
    chance I found this page "only in English" and by the way went thru all the e-
    mails. and guess what!? I (unfortunately) came to the conclusion that mostly
    silly (not to say stupid, moronic) people try themselves at these questions
    and only a small group actually know what's being talked about. anyhow all I
    wanted to say is that you did a really good job and I wanted to let you know
    that at least I appereciate it. so keep up the good work :)
    meg
  • Gość: dd IP: *.cpe.net.cable.rogers.com 04.01.03, 00:57
    w liscie motywacyjnym lub resume: available
  • Gość: lolo IP: *.ien.com.pl / 192.168.100.* 20.12.02, 14:45
    Gość portalu: ja napisał(a):

    > How would you translate??
    > Thanks in advance:))

    A "slave" would be a good word in Polish environment.
  • Gość: ania IP: *.warszawa.cvx.ppp.tpnet.pl 20.12.02, 20:09
    In my opinion you just don't have to write it...
    I'll check it, but I'm almost sure that I'm right;-)
  • Gość: chickenShorts IP: *.abo.wanadoo.fr 20.12.02, 20:29
    Oh, I agree! You don't write it and you can bet your last fiver that the
    people who said 'thanks in advance' would be foreigners, but it is not
    offensive...
  • Gość: ania IP: *.warszawa.cvx.ppp.tpnet.pl 21.12.02, 11:24
    OK, I agree to a compromise...;-)
  • Gość: Rev. Reverend IP: *.nyc.rr.com 21.12.02, 14:35
    Da horse is dead. Stop beating it.
    Get holidized.
    Merry Christmas.
  • Gość: Midwest IP: *.nuts.northwestern.edu 23.12.02, 10:16
    Gość portalu: chickenShorts napisał(a):
    > Oh, I agree! You don't write it and you can bet your last fiver that the
    > people who said 'thanks in advance' would be foreigners, but it is not
    > offensive...

    Foreigners? Wrong. Hey man, you yourself sound like a Polish-born foreigner. No, there's nothing foreign in saying
    "many thanks in advance." My wife, who is an Australianand a linguist by training, says the phrase does not reveal
    the non-Englishness of the speaker at all, whatsoever, as chickenShorts wants to suggests. From my own
    experience: over the last twelve years that I have spent in America (working in academia), I have seen this particular
    expression many times, especially in writing, and especially in semi-official documents produced by American
    native-speakers. So the Americans do use the phrase, so do the Australians; only chickenShorts advises otherwise.
    What's wrong with the guy? Given the neurotic frequency with which he appears on this forum, he needs some help.
    The recognition he seeks so agressively should be replaced by the recognition he strongly deserves from some
    doctors.
  • Gość: Bert IP: *.214.64.97.Dial1.Boston1.Level3.net 24.12.02, 17:51
    The trouble is "thank you in advance" may mean more than
    just the polite and well-intended "thank you now for the
    future favor you will certainly deliver". The inadvertent
    ambiguity that might be conveyed to the oversensitive
    kind (is he advancing his cause? why is he so sure or
    presumptuous I am ready to oblige?) might be somewhat
    awkward and uncalled for. Actually, when you come to
    think about it, the anticipation of or the hope for a
    favor would prefer the humble "please" as more logical,
    wouldn’t you agree? Do you really want to thank someone
    before he deserves your appreciation? Why dish out the
    advance on gratitude?
    Whether this is the reason or not, the fact remains
    thanking someone in advance is not frequently heard, even
    in the Midwest.
  • Gość: Midwest IP: *.nuts.northwestern.edu 24.12.02, 20:34
    Gość portalu: Bert napisał(a):

    > Whether this is the reason or not, the fact remains
    > thanking someone in advance is not frequently heard, even
    > in the Midwest.

    Good point. That's exactly what I wanted address but failed to be clear about: the phrase "many thanks in
    advance" appears primarily in writing. (I have not heard this phrase in spoken English.) Cheers,
  • Gość: Bert IP: *.214.114.251.Dial1.Boston1.Level3.net 25.12.02, 12:59
    Well, that's not the point I was making. Let me put it in
    a more direct way: Do not thank in advance either in
    informal speech or in a formal paper. Period.
    It is trite; it presumptuously assumes the favor or help
    requested will be forthcoming; it implies that the writer
    will not trouble to express appreciation after the favor
    has been done.

    Although most people who thank in advance are, most
    likely, trying to be polite the phrase sounds bad enough
    to be avoided. Why not say, "any help you can give me
    will be appreciated" instead?
  • Gość: Bert IP: *.214.64.97.Dial1.Boston1.Level3.net 24.12.02, 18:11
    At the risk of being presumptuous I would say "disposal"
    is being confused with "disposition".
    The disposal means getting rid of, while disposition
    means natural tendency or temperament. Being at one's
    disposal is not the same as being at one's disposition.
    For example, the disposition of goods is excellent (they
    are excellently disposed, arranged, or the disposition of
    an employee is commendable), but the disposal of goods
    has to be taken care of because the goods are no good
    anymore.
  • Gość: Kagan IP: *.bhakleibnitz.asn-graz.ac.at 26.12.02, 10:33
    Gość portalu: ja napisał(a):
    How would you translate??
    Thanks in advance:))
    K: "Ready to lick managerial asses at all times and in all ways".
  • Gość: Kagan IP: *.bhakleibnitz.asn-graz.ac.at 27.12.02, 05:21
    Gość portalu: ja napisał(a):
    How would you translate??
    Thanks in advance:))
    K: There are several ways to say "dyspozycyjny" in the language of
    Chaucer, Shakespeare and George Bush jr.
    1. I am always at my Boss' disposal.
    2. I am permanently at the Management service.
    3. Will do antyhing at any time for low wages.
    4. Just kick my ass, and I'll be ready for action, my Boss!
    5. I never sleep, never go to the loo, I am always ready and willing to
    receive your order, my Boss!
    6. I do not sleep, do not think, I am always at your service, oh my Boss!
    7. I have no personality, I am only an extention of my Boss.
    8. I consider it a great priviledge to serve the Company day and night
    for whatever the Management considers a fair wage.
    9. I am always on duty, more than 24 hours per callendar day.
    10. I am an ideal slave: I never question orders, and am always redy to perform
    whatever the Management wishes.
    etc.
    (For more examples please write to ljkel2@netscape.net)
  • awalk 03.01.03, 20:07
    flexible
  • Gość: zawodowiec IP: *.chm.bris.ac.uk 13.01.03, 20:45
    hows about a 3F employee - fast, flexible and focused?
    pozdro
  • Gość: jargosia IP: *.mad.east.verizon.net 14.01.03, 05:15
    flexible works best. dispositional, maybe. disposable means jednorazowa/y/e, so
    it doesn't work.
    you're safest with flexible
  • karta2 14.01.03, 17:32
    of accommodating predisposition
  • Gość: Smart Liar IP: *.nsw.bigpond.net.au 16.01.03, 13:00
    "Byc dyspozycyjnym" means more than the above statement, but do not say
    it, "prove" it.

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