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native speakers warsaw

IP: 62.233.141.* 11.07.03, 08:46
Have you ever met with situation when your native has told you that he is
real native but, when you have a meeting with him, all the time you have a
convicted that he is from Poland.
AMI
Edytor zaawansowany
  • Gość: sleepy IP: *.3web.net 11.07.03, 17:50
    right on , AMI. they mean that they were reared in an english speaking country,
    not born there, which makes a huge difference. i'd just ask the prospective
    teacher if he/she was born in that country, or just simply lived there (for a
    while).
    ;)
  • ewunia_uk 11.07.03, 18:03
    Gość portalu: sleepy napisał(a):

    > they mean that they were reared in an english speaking country,
    >

    :))))))) Reared... in the manner of piglets or other domestic stock :))))))
    --
    Ewunia

  • Gość: AMI IP: *.poleczki.dialup.inetia.pl 13.07.03, 20:54
    No that's means that your teacher makes you belive that he is natural born
    american or english and he in real is polish citizen and after two lessons you
    realize that he haven't an idea how to teach english.
    AMI
  • ewunia_uk 13.07.03, 21:02
    OKi, I know what you were trying to say, but I couldn't resist poking some fun
    at your use of the word "reared" :)))

    Not sure about American English, but in British English this word is almost
    exclusively used in reference to domestic stock.

    --
    Ewunia
  • Gość: futurekiwi IP: *.dial.tor1.sprint-canada.net 14.07.03, 01:16
    In American/Canadian English it is also used in reference to children :)
  • lol21ndm 04.08.03, 19:42
    Gość portalu: sleepy napisał(a):

    > they mean that they were reared in an english speaking country,
    >

    OMG! LOL
  • Gość: AMI IP: 62.233.141.* 14.07.03, 09:00
    Oh God!
    The real problem isn't about use some words in this or other way, but in that:
    there are people who deceive inexperienced ones and tell them that they are
    native and good in teaching, but in fact they are neither native nor good
    teacher. I want to get some idea how to avoid this problem.
  • Gość: Smyk IP: *.spurgeons.ac.uk 14.07.03, 13:01
    When you are able to see(hear) difference in,who is the fake one,you may start
    teaching English yourself,as it means you are experienced enough to teach
    others.The question remains though,how good as a teacher would you be?
    My opinion is,the only real English teachers are the Brits,who can speak
    "Queens English",others do not speak proper English.Did I mention middle class
    yet?But that's Pandoras box I do not want to open.Smile
  • ewunia_uk 14.07.03, 21:51
    Gość portalu: Smyk napisał(a):

    > My opinion is,the only real English teachers are the Brits,who can speak
    > "Queens English",others do not speak proper English.Did I mention middle
    class
    > yet?

    Even the British Ministry of Education does not believe this! Local dialects
    are actively encouraged in British schools, and teachers are told not to
    correct regional variations. Even the BBC is bringing in more and more
    regional newscasters. The most popular BBC newsreader at the moment is a
    Welshman with a very strong Welsh accent.

    The insistence on teaching "Queen's English" is producing a crop of "fluent
    English speakers" who come to the UK and are unable to understand a word the
    locals speak.

    As for "middle class"... I don't really know what to say. What's this got to
    do with the price of eggs at the Co-op?

    --
    Ewunia (a Geordie lass through and through)

  • Gość: Smyk IP: *.blueyonder.co.uk 15.07.03, 12:13
    ewunia_uk napisała:

    > Gość portalu: Smyk napisał(a):
    >
    > > My opinion is,the only real English teachers are the Brits,who can speak
    > > "Queens English",others do not speak proper English.Did I mention middle
    > class
    > > yet?
    >
    > Even the British Ministry of Education does not believe this! > regional
    newscasters. The most popular BBC newsreader at the moment isLocal dialects
    > are actively encouraged in British schools, and teachers are told not to
    > correct regional variations. Even the BBC is bringing in more and more
    a
    > Welshman with a very strong Welsh accent.
    >
    > The insistence on teaching "Queen's English" is producing a crop of "fluent
    > English speakers" who come to the UK and are unable to understand a word the
    > locals speak.
    >
    > As for "middle class"... I don't really know what to say. What's this got to
    > do with the price of eggs at the Co-op?
    >
    You are talking about "political correctness" and I am talking about "quality
    English" and you've got to admit that where it comes to quality of speech,you
    can't get much better than "middle class,leafy suburbs"of South East!
    I am not trying to wind you up,as I myself do not belong here(middle class Pole
    living in Bromley-that says it all),but my boy goes to very nice school in
    typical middle English area,and the people he mixes with speak purest of the
    pure English.He also plays football (in working class area)and you can hear the
    diffrence in what boys say,and how they say it(even when boys swear the middle
    class kids do it in polite way).
    I like friendliness of people from the north,but don't you think some of them
    are a bit of tight?But the sexsiest accent according to some survey in Irish
    one.
    Never mind,we all are trying to improve ourselves all the time and in order to
    do that we need to look up to someone,so I am not a snob yet but getting there.
    Have a brilliant time in Poland and enjoy yourself.God bless
  • peter09 31.07.03, 11:24
    Smyk - where in Bromley are you from.. i live just round the corner from
    Bromley.

    In reference to the topic, i can call myself a real native speaker - i was
    born and lived all my life in England. I was also lucky to be taught polish
    from a young age and have now gone to live in Warsaw. Although currently
    sitting in Amsterdam for a year due to work.

    I have to say that i can here a huge difference between real native speakers
    and speakers that call themselves native. I think its just the uniqueness of
    English that makes it very hard for a non "real" native speaker to effectively
    learn the language proficiently...

    rgds,
  • Gość: nativechick IP: *.warszawa.cvx.ppp.tpnet.pl 14.07.03, 14:02
    I was born in Poland and left when I was a child. I can't speak proper Polish
    and I've been speaking English my whole life. So, I'm not a native speaker?
    Who can judge me? Native speaker refers to language ability not place of birth!
  • Gość: sleepy IP: *.3web.net 14.07.03, 14:41
    nativechick, you say that you were "born in Poland and left when [you were] a
    child. [You] can't speak proper Polish and [you]'ve been speaking English [your]
    whole life." There is a contradiction in here: did your parents speak English
    where they were first had you in Poland? Did your mother speak English to you
    while in Poland and later on abroad while you were growing up? You could be
    classified as a 'native' speaker in the other sense, the sense of being
    encultured in your new community and its language. Becoming proficient in the
    use of the new language for someone whose English is a second language is
    extremely rare. To judge your level of having acquired this quality of
    proficiency is the job of a language specialist, a linguist or just any other
    educated person whose mother's first language was English. Judging by the few
    words you have offered us in your post, i'd say you are very proficient in the
    use of that language, and for me you are a native, even though the dictionary
    definition of a one seems to question that....
    ;)
  • Gość: native2 IP: *.warszawa.cvx.ppp.tpnet.pl 15.07.03, 09:51
    I am in the same position as native chick. I think all you people who are
    looking for native speakers should pray that your teacher speaks Polish
    because most of you speak very little English and have problems communicating.
    I had some students that insisted I only spoke English and our learning was
    like in kindergarden, simply drawing pictures.;)


    Gość portalu: sleepy napisał(a):

    > nativechick, you say that you were "born in Poland and left when [you were]
    a
    > child. [You] can't speak proper Polish and [you]'ve been speaking English
    [your
    > ]
    > whole life." There is a contradiction in here: did your parents speak
    English
    > where they were first had you in Poland? Did your mother speak English to
    you
    > while in Poland and later on abroad while you were growing up? You could be
    > classified as a 'native' speaker in the other sense, the sense of being
    > encultured in your new community and its language. Becoming proficient in
    the
    > use of the new language for someone whose English is a second language is
    > extremely rare. To judge your level of having acquired this quality of
    > proficiency is the job of a language specialist, a linguist or just any
    other
    > educated person whose mother's first language was English. Judging by the
    few
    > words you have offered us in your post, i'd say you are very proficient in
    the
    > use of that language, and for me you are a native, even though the
    dictionary
    > definition of a one seems to question that....
    > ;)
  • Gość: AMI IP: 62.233.141.* 14.07.03, 15:47
    I've thought about situation when your teacher makes you belive that he is
    native and in fact he have never been, or only for some time, abroad and have a
    wacky accent. Question was how to immediately examine teacher and not to be
    made to look like an idiot and safe money. I want to know if somebody have met
    that situation.
    Gość portalu: nativechick napisał(a):

    > I was born in Poland and left when I was a child. I can't speak proper Polish
    > and I've been speaking English my whole life. So, I'm not a native speaker?
    > Who can judge me? Native speaker refers to language ability not place of
    birth!
  • waldek.usa 14.07.03, 19:35




    Gość portalu: AMI napisał(a):

    > I've thought about situation when your teacher makes you belive that he is
    > native and in fact he have never been, or only for some time, abroad and have
    a
    >
    > wacky accent. Question was how to immediately examine teacher and not to be
    > made to look like an idiot and safe money. I want to know if somebody have
    met
    > that situation.
    > Gość portalu: nativechick napisał(a):
    >
    > > I was born in Poland and left when I was a child. I can't speak proper Pol
    > ish
    > > and I've been speaking English my whole life. So, I'm not a native speaker
    > ?
    > > Who can judge me? Native speaker refers to language ability not place of
    > birth!


    Hi there!

    I had been an interpreter/translator for The Superior Court in Massachusetts
    for few years. Because I was born and educated all the way up to the graduate
    level in Poland, and have mastered Polish, I was classified as a native
    speaker. During the interview I went through all kinds of language tests. The
    work itself was really interesting and demanding. The judge would usually ask
    me if I wanted to translate simultaneously, or sentence by sentence. I would
    choose simultaneous with sentence-by-sentence option, because from time to time
    you have to stop and explain. In this kind of translating you have to be most
    sensitive of cultural differences. Many people don’t speak perfect Polish, even
    if they have lived all their lives in Poland – I didn’t have to say this, but I
    did anyway.
    How to tell a phony from a genuine native speaker? Just listen to them, seems
    that simple unless I have missed something. It takes more than “some” time to
    master the language. I don’t care how boastful people are – it takes few years.
    Also – ask for references. I have mine from the Court.
    Now, if you can tell me what “safe money” is? Or is it “save money”?
    Also, “…he…have a wacky accent” – don’t mind me but “he” “has”…always.
    No hard feelings... ;))

  • Gość: AMI IP: *.poleczki.dialup.inetia.pl 15.07.03, 09:23
    Hey!
    I'm not good enough in english, but about "safe" I'd like to say that I'm not
    spending money, maybe I should use "save" nevermind for now, about "wacky"
    or "whacky"-(informal) absurdly, or amusingly eccentric or irrational.
    Anyway thanks for your response.
    AMI
  • waldek.usa 15.07.03, 17:58
    Hi there!
    I have just realized where you are. You are in ? Warsaw ? Now I understand your
    concerns. It's hard to tell how real the person is. However, you can still
    tell. I can can give you lessons for ,say, coffee or something stronger ;D
    Bye
  • Gość: native3 IP: *.warszawa.cvx.ppp.tpnet.pl 15.07.03, 09:58
    hello-Most of the people who look for natives in Poland speak very little
    English and can't tell the difference.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > Gość portalu: AMI napisał(a):
    >
    > > I've thought about situation when your teacher makes you belive that he is
    >
    > > native and in fact he have never been, or only for some time, abroad and h
    > ave
    > a
    > >
    > > wacky accent. Question was how to immediately examine teacher and not to b
    > e
    > > made to look like an idiot and safe money. I want to know if somebody have
    >
    > met
    > > that situation.
    > > Gość portalu: nativechick napisał(a):
    > >
    > > > I was born in Poland and left when I was a child. I can't speak prope
    > r Pol
    > > ish
    > > > and I've been speaking English my whole life. So, I'm not a native sp
    > eaker
    > > ?
    > > > Who can judge me? Native speaker refers to language ability not place
    > of
    > > birth!
    >
    >
    > Hi there!
    >
    > I had been an interpreter/translator for The Superior Court in Massachusetts
    > for few years. Because I was born and educated all the way up to the
    graduate
    > level in Poland, and have mastered Polish, I was classified as a native
    > speaker. During the interview I went through all kinds of language tests.
    The
    > work itself was really interesting and demanding. The judge would usually
    ask
    > me if I wanted to translate simultaneously, or sentence by sentence. I would
    > choose simultaneous with sentence-by-sentence option, because from time to
    time
    >
    > you have to stop and explain. In this kind of translating you have to be
    most
    > sensitive of cultural differences. Many people don’t speak perfect Polish
    > , even
    > if they have lived all their lives in Poland – I didn’t have to say
    > this, but I
    > did anyway.
    > How to tell a phony from a genuine native speaker? Just listen to them,
    seems
    > that simple unless I have missed something. It takes more than “some̶
    > 1; time to
    > master the language. I don’t care how boastful people are – it take
    > s few years.
    > Also – ask for references. I have mine from the Court.
    > Now, if you can tell me what “safe money” is? Or is it “save
    > money”?
    > Also, “…he…have a wacky accent” – don’t min
    > d me but “he” “has”…always.
    > No hard feelings... ;))
    >
  • Gość: native IP: *.warszawa.cvx.ppp.tpnet.pl 01.08.03, 15:52
    safe and save are two different words, and what the hell do you know about
    accents?!?


    Gość portalu: AMI napisał(a):

    > I've thought about situation when your teacher makes you belive that he is
    > native and in fact he have never been, or only for some time, abroad and
    have a
    >
    > wacky accent. Question was how to immediately examine teacher and not to be
    > made to look like an idiot and safe money. I want to know if somebody have
    met
    > that situation.
    > Gość portalu: nativechick napisał(a):
    >
    > > I was born in Poland and left when I was a child. I can't speak proper Pol
    > ish
    > > and I've been speaking English my whole life. So, I'm not a native speaker
    > ?
    > > Who can judge me? Native speaker refers to language ability not place of
    > birth!
  • teach 14.07.03, 16:12
    Gość portalu: ami napisał(a):

    > Have you ever met with situation when your native has told you that he is
    > real native but, when you have a meeting with him, all the time you have a
    > convicted that he is from Poland.
    > AMI

    A native speaker can only be someone who from the very beginning was immersed
    in English: his parents, all around him spoke that language.

    Anyone who tries to say different is fooling no-one, except perhaps themselves.

    If your teacher's name is 'John Smith' or similar he's probably not Polish! If
    in doubt ask to see his passport.

  • wannabekiwi 15.07.03, 12:26

    > A native speaker can only be someone who from the very beginning was
    immersed
    > in English: his parents, all around him spoke that language.
    >
    > Anyone who tries to say different is fooling no-one, except perhaps
    themselves.

    My son was born in an English-speaking country (we still live in an English-
    speaking country), however, for the first five years of his life, that is
    before he started school, he was "immersed" in Polish language and culture.
    Most people he was surrounded by spoke to him in Polish. My son didn't even
    begin to talk in English until he went to school at the age of five and now
    he's speaking better English than Polish. Yet, according to your definition,
    he is not "native" because he wasn't immersed in English from the very
    beginning, only from the age of five. Hmmm, I really think you should adjust
    your definition because it doesn't apply to each and every case. Nothing
    personal :)

    Cheers.
  • waldek.usa 15.07.03, 18:45
    A five year old child can become a native speaker. At this age there is no
    problem. There was a case of a Japanese five year old girl living in Poland,
    going to school there, the whole nine yards. She became "polonized", but she
    never lost her Nihongo. To become a true native speaker one must learn more
    than just everyday or primary school-level language.
    Bye
  • Gość: ewa IP: *.csfb.com 01.08.03, 14:13
    > A five year old child can become a native speaker. At this age there is no
    > problem. There was a case of a Japanese five year old girl living in Poland,
    > going to school there, the whole nine yards. She became "polonized", but she
    > never lost her Nihongo. To become a true native speaker one must learn more
    > than just everyday or primary school-level language.
    > Bye

    Of course you cannot judge five-year-olds abilities the same way as you would
    do adults. My kids were born in Australia, where they started speaking both
    Polish (at home) and English (in kindergarten).
    My husband is Polish as well so we insist they speak Polish at home, but it is,
    and always will be, their second language. Their native language is English, be
    it Australian, or British. Their ability to adapt is amazing!! We have been
    living in UK for 2 and a half years now and you cannot tell the difference
    between them and other local kids when they spead English. After all they spend
    nearly 7 hours at school every day.
  • Gość: AMI IP: 62.233.141.* 17.07.03, 13:37
    Discussion is very interesting but for me the problem is: HOW TO KEEP OUT OF
    teachers who lying and want only to get money. Two person have written about
    check the passport and references it's good idea. I've fought about it but I've
    judged is as na act of rudness. For now i think it was a good idea. By this
    thread I've wanted to warn each one who wants to lern english and look for
    teacher on his own, in that case it's necessary to examine the teacher very
    well. Otherwise you will not learnt what does really means one or another word
    and will have a problem with speaking correctly. I've written about this
    because now I have problem like this. It's for warning everybody.
    AMI
  • Gość: english-test.net IP: *.dip0.t-ipconnect.de 17.07.03, 19:08
    Well, learning a language is a complex process that requires a lot of
    different activities. Having lessons with a native speaker of English can be
    one of them.
    However, being born and having grown up in the UK, US or any other 'English
    speaking country' is no guarantee for a good teacher nor is holing a
    University degree.
    If you can trust your own personal skills you will find out whether a teacher
    suits your needs or not without checking his or her documents, wouldn't you
    agree?
    Regards,
    english-test.net
  • Gość: AMI IP: 62.233.141.* 18.07.03, 08:09
    Exactly!
    But it will cost a lot of money, before I'll find a suitable teacher.
    AMI
  • Gość: I IP: *.warszawa.cvx.ppp.tpnet.pl 31.07.03, 22:29

    Gość portalu: english-test.net napisał(a):

    > Well, learning a language is a complex process that requires a lot of
    > different activities. Having lessons with a native speaker of English can be
    > one of them.
    > However, being born and having grown up in the UK, US or any other 'English
    > speaking country' is no guarantee for a good teacher nor is holing a
    > University degree.
    > If you can trust your own personal skills you will find out whether a
    teacher
    > suits your needs or not without checking his or her documents, wouldn't you
    > agree?
    > Regards,
    > english-test.net


    exactly my poin I agree 100 percent! Just because you were born there doesn't
    mean that you have the qualities to teach. How many people in Poland don' know
    how to speak Polish properly??? Would you like to take lessons from those
    people. My American friend is learning Polish in Warsaw and he can't find one
    good teacher and poland hs how many native speakers????? 30 million or more?
  • Gość: ewa IP: *.csfb.com 01.08.03, 14:16
    > Two person have written about check the passport and references
    > it's good idea. I've fought about it but I've judged is as na act
    > of rudness.

    I'm not sure about the passport, but asking for references has nothing
    to do with rudeness. It is a common practice everywhere when employing
    someone.
  • Gość: dry IP: 62.233.141.* 28.07.03, 14:34
    Gość portalu: ami napisał(a):

    > Have you ever met with situation when your native has told you that he is
    > real native but, when you have a meeting with him, all the time you have a
    > convicted that he is from Poland.
    > AMI


    It's a big problem I dont know how to find a solution of thus situation but
    I've had common problem.
    Dry
  • peter09 31.07.03, 11:37
    personally, i don't think there is any solution that will work in all cases.

    i think it comes down to personal judgement and checking out the background of
    the person as well as possible.
  • Gość: I IP: *.warszawa.cvx.ppp.tpnet.pl 31.07.03, 21:50
    and you crazy people thing that if a person doenst speak polish it means that
    he/she is a better teacher. buhahaha
  • Gość: native IP: *.warszawa.cvx.ppp.tpnet.pl 01.08.03, 15:46
    Gość portalu: ami napisał(a):

    > Have you ever met with situation when your native has told you that he is
    > real native but, when you have a meeting with him, all the time you have a
    > convicted that he is from Poland.
    > AMI


    AMI, I think we know each other. Please don’t offend the people who managed to
    learn more than one language during their lifetime. You seem to be a little
    jelous that you never had this opportunity. People who were born in an English
    speaking country or went there as little children are native speaker believe
    it or not. Those who can speak Polish should be very proud of themselves that
    they have learned abroad where they had very little contact with this very
    hard to learn language. Their parents spend lots of money to send them to
    polish schools or on vacations to Poland. It is not as easy as you may think.
    You think that just for your purposes I am going to forget Polish? I also put
    lots of effort to be fluent in Spanish, or at least my Spanish is much better
    than your English, no offense. I wish you luck with finding a native speaker
    from NZ or Australia.
  • Gość: AMI IP: 62.233.141.* 04.08.03, 10:06
    I don't know if we know each other, but "native" who've taught me knows polish
    language maybe better than me and doesn't know a lot of english words I think
    basic even for children in english speaking country. In such a situation it's
    just dishonest to tell student that teacher is native-speaker. It's doesn't
    matter for me how many other language he knows.
    I don't know what's the problem with NZ or Australia.


    Gość portalu: native napisał(a):

    > Gość portalu: ami napisał(a):
    >
    > > Have you ever met with situation when your native has told you that he is
    > > real native but, when you have a meeting with him, all the time you have a
    >
    > > convicted that he is from Poland.
    > > AMI
    >
    >
    > AMI, I think we know each other. Please don’t offend the people who manag
    > ed to
    > learn more than one language during their lifetime. You seem to be a little
    > jelous that you never had this opportunity. People who were born in an
    English
    > speaking country or went there as little children are native speaker believe
    > it or not. Those who can speak Polish should be very proud of themselves that
    > they have learned abroad where they had very little contact with this very
    > hard to learn language. Their parents spend lots of money to send them to
    > polish schools or on vacations to Poland. It is not as easy as you may think.
    > You think that just for your purposes I am going to forget Polish? I also put
    > lots of effort to be fluent in Spanish, or at least my Spanish is much better
    > than your English, no offense. I wish you luck with finding a native speaker
    > from NZ or Australia.
  • Gość: majka IP: *.acn.waw.pl 01.08.03, 20:41
    Gość portalu: ami napisał(a):

    > Have you ever met with situation when your native has told you that he is
    > real native but, when you have a meeting with him, all the time you have a
    > convicted that he is from Poland.
    > AMI

    Yes, I have met similar situation in Warsaw. It was only one meeting...
  • Gość: AMI IP: 62.233.141.* 04.08.03, 10:14
    Can you let me know me about the contact wit this "native" (e.g. e-mail) so
    that I will have a possibility recognize this person before I do mistake again?


    Gość portalu: majka napisał(a):

    > Gość portalu: ami napisał(a):
    >
    > > Have you ever met with situation when your native has told you that he is
    > > real native but, when you have a meeting with him, all the time you have a
    >
    > > convicted that he is from Poland.
    > > AMI
    >
    > Yes, I have met similar situation in Warsaw. It was only one meeting...
  • Gość: vito IP: *.neoplus.adsl.tpnet.pl 09.09.03, 09:33
    I have had the same situation, it's really big problem. Always look at the
    pasport first at list.

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