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"Crazy is my life"

25.11.11, 19:07
Czy to zdanie jest poprawne gramatycznie?
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    • gosiabutler Re: "Crazy is my life" 28.11.11, 10:45
      ...bo to jest gramatyka plus, dla Polaków trudna do zrozumienia (w podręczniku nie ma). Anastrofa, inwersja -" anastrofa" znaczy przecież "odwrócić kota ogonem". Angielski - język prozodyczny, więc odwracamy "normalny" tok zdania, budujemy stopę prozodyczną "nienormalną" w zwykłym języku i już możemy rozciągać sylaby (np. w śpiewaniu). A teraz weźcie się do poprawiania różnych "lopsided" treści w Biblii i u Szekspira.
      • bunkum Re: "Crazy is my life" 29.11.11, 19:52
        > ...bo to jest gramatyka plus, dla Polaków trudna do zrozumienia (w podręczniku
        > nie ma). Anastrofa, inwersja -" anastrofa" znaczy przecież "odwrócić kota ogone
        > m". Angielski - język prozodyczny, więc odwracamy "normalny" tok zdania, buduje
        > my stopę prozodyczną "nienormalną" w zwykłym języku i już możemy rozciągać syla
        > by (np. w śpiewaniu). A teraz weźcie się do poprawiania różnych "lopsided" tre
        > ści w Biblii i u Szekspira.

        Why don’t you call Shakespeare or any of the Biblical dudes and have them come up with a context enforcing "crazy is my life" over "my life is crazy."
        If they don’t answer the phone or hang up on you, you do it or have the other dumbo help you.
      • paulski Re: "Crazy is my life" 01.12.11, 17:10
        > ...bo to jest gramatyka plus, dla Polaków trudna do zrozumienia (w podręczniku
        > nie ma). Anastrofa, inwersja -" anastrofa" znaczy przecież "odwrócić kota ogone
        > m". Angielski - język prozodyczny, więc odwracamy "normalny" tok zdania, buduje
        > my stopę prozodyczną "nienormalną" w zwykłym języku i już możemy rozciągać syla
        > by (np. w śpiewaniu). A teraz weźcie się do poprawiania różnych "lopsided" tre
        > ści w Biblii i u Szekspira.

        You are talking nonsense.There are a few types of inversion, well known and described in common grammar books (exclamatory, linking, negative, conditional, narrative...)
        An unnecessary inversion is always a flop. It is a distortion and there must be a darn good reason for it to use it. It's not a remedy for lack of writing style.
    • claratrueba Re: "Crazy is my life" 30.11.11, 10:16
      "Tender is the Night" by F. Scott Fitzgerald is also an example of such figure of speech. Grammar is not a set of unbreakable rules and the use of sophisticated rhetoric devices in titles or descriptions of unusual situations is not uncommon.
      • pierwszy-donosiciel Re: "Crazy is my life" 30.11.11, 13:56
        claratrueba napisała:

        > "Tender is the Night" by F. Scott Fitzgerald is also an example of such figure
        > of speech. Grammar is not a set of unbreakable rules and the use of sophistica
        > ted rhetoric devices in titles or descriptions of unusual situations is not unc
        > ommon.
        --------------------------------------------
      • paulski Re: "Crazy is my life" 01.12.11, 17:18
        claratrueba napisała:

        > "Tender is the Night" by F. Scott Fitzgerald is also an example of such figure
        > of speech.

        Not the greatest title on earth.

        Grammar is not a set of unbreakable rules and the use of sophistica
        > ted rhetoric devices in titles or descriptions of unusual situations is not unc
        > ommon.

        Inversions and other "sophisticated rhetoric devices" are fully legitimate when needed, but
        you have no idea what you are talking about.
        • claratrueba Re: "Crazy is my life" 02.12.11, 10:07
          > you have no idea what you are talking about.

          I'm talking about literature, lyrics, lawyers' bomabastic arguments (the final ones in particular), politicians' performances, sermons and slogans.
          And exclamation of a judge at International Dog Show: "Beautiful is she!" (the Best of the Show winning dog)
          And CNN reporter saying "dead they were" (Fallujah bridge- the notorius Blackwater case) as the fact, that the men were dead before burnt and hanged was crucial.
          I'm definitely not talking about of "Expensive are my shoes"


          • paulski Re: "Crazy is my life" 03.12.11, 19:31
            > I'm talking about literature, lyrics, lawyers' bomabastic arguments (the final
            > ones in particular), politicians' performances, sermons and slogans.

            But we are talking about the nonpoetic crazy is my life, for Pete's sake.
            Both crazy is my life and my life is crazy are embarrassingly unmeaning efforts, but my life is crazy does not pretend to be something more than it really is.

            > I'm definitely not talking about of "Expensive are my shoes"
            Why not? That's the rubric that crazy is my life belongs in.

            > I'm definitely not talking about of "Expensive are my shoes"
            That's the problem.
            And expensive they are would be fully legit as a linking inversion.
            • paulski Re: "Crazy is my life" 03.12.11, 19:41
              > a już na pewno po polsku "Czuła jest noc" brzmi zdecydowanie lepiej niż "Noc je
              > st czuła" :)

              CZULA?
              Read the book.
              Try vulnerable.

              The polysemy of tender is possibly why F. lifted the whole thing from Keat's POEM.

              Away! away! for I will fly to thee,
              Not charioted by Bacchus and his pards,
              But on the viewless wings of Poesy,
              Though the dull brain perplexes and retards:
              Already with thee! tender is the night,
              And haply the Queen-Moon is on her throne,
              Clustered around by all her starry fays;

              The inversion (How) crazy is my life is exclamatory, and its only purpose can be lending undeserved prominence to the overused, abused, and therefore insignificant word crazy.

    • claratrueba Re: "Crazy is my life" 03.12.11, 20:54
      Whatever we say here about propriety or impropriety of this phase let's just try to sing this:
      teksty.org/golec-uorkiestra,crazy-is-my-life,tekst-piosenki
      replacing it with "my life is crazy"
      Licentia poetica and that's all. Even if "poetica" is a little questionable in this case.
      • paulski Re: "Crazy is my life" 03.12.11, 21:24
        > Whatever we say....
        No. Whatever you say.

        > Licentia poetica and that's all. Even if "poetica" is a little questionable in
        > this case.

        That's really pathetic "poetica."
        Why meaningless foreign-language inclusion in a Polish lyric then? Poles must be with it, and with-it speak must be English, right?
        La la la would do just fine.
        • claratrueba Re: "Crazy is my life" 04.12.11, 06:22
          > La la la would do just fine.
          If the author had wanted to include it, he'd have done it. Fitzgerald would have formed the above mentioned title in the standard manner. Their intentions were different than gramatical correctness.
          In exactly the same way we may condemn any author.
          But they are not English (or any language) teachers nad their intention is not providing the knowledge concerning grammar.

                      • bunkum Re: "Crazy is my life" 10.12.11, 21:40
                        Those are church hymns. Holy is the Lam is very much OK in a church hymn.

                        Juicy is the lam is not acceptable in a restaurant in response to the waiter's How is everything?

                        Crazy is my life is OK nowhere.
                        • claratrueba Re: "Crazy is my life" 11.12.11, 07:04
                          That dispute brings to my mind my fierce discourse with my son's English teacher.
                          I read his essay on capital penalty corrected by the teacher and with her remarks and saw red (I don't mean the color of the remarks and corrections). I mean what was done to the oryginal text.
                          Citation begining with "Never shall I.." replaced with "I will never.." "Thou shalt not kill" exchanged into "Do not kill".
                          Out of a moving and thrilling appeal, a plain and banal composition was made.
                          The teacher's explanation was "a teenage student should write in the way it is accepted by school". I was speechless.
                          Is a SAS soldier entitled to describe his ordeal as desperate counting last rounds in his half empty bergen, helplessly calling for casevac and end with ".. but the answer came there none"? (Chris Ryan "the One That Got Away")
                          Or should we correct him? According to the very idea of one proper and terrible boring plain English?
                          Never shall I accept such approach. Out of respect to any author whatever his or her work is.
                          • bunkum Re: "Crazy is my life" 12.12.11, 17:55
                            > Citation begining with "Never shall I.." replaced with "I will never.." "Thou s
                            > halt not kill" exchanged into "Do not kill".

                            Quotations should be invariant as long as they are marked as such.

                            > Out of a moving and thrilling appeal, a plain and banal composition was made.

                            Inversion must serve its purpose. Please explain why you inverted
                            A plain and banal composition was made out of a moving and thrilling appeal.
                            into
                            Out of a moving and thrilling appeal, a plain and banal composition was made.


                            > Is a SAS soldier entitled to describe his ordeal as desperate counting last rou
                            > nds in his half empty bergen, helplessly calling for casevac and end with ".. b
                            > ut the answer came there none"? (Chris Ryan "the One That Got Away")

                            Are you trying to tell me that a solder in distress interleaves but the answer came there none between the normal f...s and s…s to describe his desperation?
                            Have you tried to sort it out and put it back into its original form?

                            > Never shall I accept such approach. Out of respect to any author whatever his o
                            > r her work is.

                            Why did you invert I shall never… into Never shall I…? You must have had a reason. What was it?

                            Unnecessary inversions are always awkward and ugly. I don't think you know what's ugly in writing and what's not. The attributive above-mentioned before a noun is always ugly. His or her is also hard to swallow.
                            • republican Re: "Crazy is my life" 12.12.11, 18:31
                              bunkum napisała:

                              >>
                              > Unnecessary inversions are always awkward and ugly. I don't think you know wha
                              > t's ugly in writing and what's not. The attributive above-mentioned befo
                              > re a noun is always ugly. His or her is also hard to swallow.

                              As always I am impressed with those absolute statements derived from useless memorization of grammatical principles.
                              Put some poetry in your prose of life.
                              A propos:
                              Translate ONE sentence I asked for above. Demonstrate your expertize.
                              PS
                              How many rules are violated here?

                              "Never in the field of human conflict was so much owed by so many to so few"
                            • claratrueba Re: "Crazy is my life" 13.12.11, 07:38
                              > Inversion must serve its purpose. Please explain why you inverted
                              > A plain and banal composition was made out of a moving and thrilling appeal.
                              >

                              > into
                              > Out of a moving and thrilling appeal, a plain and banal composition was made
                              > .
                              The purpose is simple and commonly used - by inverting the sentence the author emphasises the importance of the part which was put in the beginning. The same applies to "crazy" and "tender" in the titles.

                              > Are you trying to tell me that a solder in distress interleaves but the answ
                              > er came there none
                              between the normal f...s and s…s to describe his d
                              > esperation?
                              > Have you tried to sort it out and put it back into its original form?

                              The soldier is the author of the book. Which I personally recomend. As well as books in English in general to comprehend what a language is in its varieties, atmosphere etc.

                              > Why did you invert I shall never… into Never shall I…?
                              > ] You must have had a reason. What was it?
                              Emphasising my stark standing. As a parallel to such sentences used by any right defenders.

                              ]His or her
                              is also hard to swallow.
                              Right. According to the newest trend it should have been "they". Which is so absurd that I still stick to the rules dictated by anti-discrimination regulations.

                              • bunkum Re: "Crazy is my life" 13.12.11, 16:16
                                > The purpose is simple and commonly used - by inverting the sentence the author
                                > emphasises the importance of the part which was put in the beginning.

                                Wrong. This inversion is not exclamatory and emphasizes nothing. You don't even know what it is supposed to do.

                                >The same applies to "crazy" and "tender" in the titles
                                .
                                Wrong again. Not the same at all. Exclamatory inversion fits right in when what its name intimates is called for: applauding or groaning, praising or moaning. Memorize it. It rhymes.


                                > > Why did you invert I shall never… into Never shall I̷
                                > 0;?

                                > > ] You must have had a reason. What was it?
                                > Emphasising my stark standing. As a parallel to such sentences used by any righ
                                > t defenders.

                                I shall never… is emphatic enough. This inversion does not belong in your incompetent post, but you will never know why.

                                > Right. According to the newest trend it should have been "they". Which is so ab
                                > surd that I still stick to the rules dictated by anti-discrimination regulation
                                > s.

                                Your linguistic taste be damned?

                                > The soldier is the author of the book. Which I personally recomend. As well as
                                > books in English in general to comprehend what a language is in its varieties,
                                > atmosphere etc...

                                Lady, you are one of those semiliterate underachievers who, aware of their deficits in correct grammar and writing skill, resort to grammatical construct they don't understand and routinely misapply.

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