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I ll teach u Polish

25.03.06, 15:09
I ll teach u Polish from the very beginning, fluent English speaker, after a
scholarship in Ireland. Warsaw only - lessons close to a metro station or at
my place (Kabaty). contact: julia.urszula@gmail.com
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    • usenetposts And we'll teach you English 25.03.06, 15:34
      > I ll teach u Polish from the very beginning, fluent English speaker, after a
      > scholarship in Ireland. Warsaw only - lessons close to a metro station or at
      > my place (Kabaty). contact: julia.urszula@gmail.com

      When you say you are a "fluent English speaker, after a scholarship in
      Ireland", do you mean that you are a fluent English speaker having been to
      Ireland on a scholarship, or that you would like to go to Ireland on a
      scholarship?
      • usenetposts Re: I ll teach u Polish 25.03.06, 23:35
        yoric napisał:

        > I actually parsed it this way:
        > Hey, you fluent English speaker! After a scholarship in Ireland, I will teach
        > you Polish!
        >
        > no offence smile

        Your interpretation was just as valid, actually. When somebody takes such
        liberties with the rules of punctuation, it is hard to find a path through the
        ambiguities in any language.

        I just hope the scholarship was in one of the non-literary subjects.

        I recommend Lynne Truss' book on punctuation to the original poster, and to
        take note that "jestem po czyms" doesn't translate directly into English.
        • russh Re: I ll teach u Polish 25.03.06, 23:42
          I always quote the following when stressing the importance of correct punctuation:

          An English teacher wrote these words on the whiteboard: "woman without her man
          is nothing". The teacher then asked the students to punctuate the words correctly.

          The men wrote: "Woman, without her man, is nothing."

          The women wrote: "Woman! Without her, man is nothing."
          • hardenfelt Re: I ll teach u Polish 30.03.06, 22:08
            russh napisał:

            > I always quote the following when stressing the importance of correct
            punctuati
            > on:
            >
            > An English teacher wrote these words on the whiteboard: "woman without her man
            > is nothing". The teacher then asked the students to punctuate the words
            correct
            > ly.
            >
            > The men wrote: "Woman, without her man, is nothing."


            I am not a master on punctuation. Actually I only follow my own rules in
            English and Danish (in Polish it’s easy but the commas are senseless), maybe
            because Danish changed their official comma rules 4 times since WW2 and nobody
            seams to bother now. To me a comma should have some sense. As far as I
            understand the Brits are almost as confused as the Danes. But I admit, I now
            little about English comma rules.

            Anyway, I must admit – I’m simply unable to see the sense of the commas in the
            following sentence: "Woman, without her man, is nothing."

            “without her man” is defining the subject – you just cannot separate it
            from “woman” without destroying the sentence. Furthermore there is no natural
            pause, which to me is the main indicator of when to place a comma. I just don’t
            understand it. Maybe someone would explain the rule in this particular case.
            • usenetposts Re: I ll teach u Polish 30.03.06, 22:15
              hardenfelt napisał:

              > russh napisał:
              >
              > > I always quote the following when stressing the importance of correct
              > punctuati
              > > on:
              > >
              > > An English teacher wrote these words on the whiteboard: "woman without he
              > r man
              > > is nothing". The teacher then asked the students to punctuate the words
              > correct
              > > ly.
              > >
              > > The men wrote: "Woman, without her man, is nothing."
              >
              >
              > I am not a master on punctuation. Actually I only follow my own rules in
              > English and Danish (in Polish it’s easy but the commas are senseless), ma
              > ybe
              > because Danish changed their official comma rules 4 times since WW2 and
              nobody
              > seams to bother now. To me a comma should have some sense. As far as I
              > understand the Brits are almost as confused as the Danes. But I admit, I now
              > little about English comma rules.
              >
              > Anyway, I must admit – I’m simply unable to see the sense of the co
              > mmas in the
              > following sentence: "Woman, without her man, is nothing."
              >
              > “without her man” is defining the subject – you just cannot s
              > eparate it
              > from “woman” without destroying the sentence. Furthermore there is
              > no natural
              > pause, which to me is the main indicator of when to place a comma. I just
              don&#
              > 8217;t
              > understand it. Maybe someone would explain the rule in this particular case.

              It is all about the main clause and the subordinate clause. The commas here set
              off "without her man" as the subordinate clause, making "woman is nothing" the
              main clause. It is therefore woman who is nothing here, qualified as when she
              does not have her man.

              In the case of "woman: without her, man is nothing" we have the colon
              separating the rest of the sentence from as it were the subject header. "Man is
              nothing" then is the mainclause, "without her" is the subordinate clause
              and "woman" is almost like the subject header, and we end up with the male sex
              being defined as nothing, instead, qualified as "without her - namely woman".

              Got it?
              • hardenfelt Re: I ll teach u Polish 31.03.06, 06:32
                David wrote:
                It is all about the main clause and the subordinate clause. The commas here set
                >
                > off "without her man" as the subordinate clause, making "woman is nothing"
                the
                > main clause. It is therefore woman who is nothing here, qualified as when she
                > does not have her man.
                >
                > Got it?
                >
                Not really.

                „without her man” cannot be a clause. A clause should contain a subject and a
                verb. To me it looks like a prepositional phrase which is post-modifying a noun
                phrase (woman). Maybe I should join your Saturday morning English lessons!
                • usenetposts To non-finity and beyond! 31.03.06, 10:22
                  hardenfelt napisał:

                  > David wrote:
                  > It is all about the main clause and the subordinate clause. The commas here
                  set
                  > >
                  > > off "without her man" as the subordinate clause, making "woman is nothing
                  > "
                  > the
                  > > main clause. It is therefore woman who is nothing here, qualified as when
                  > she
                  > > does not have her man.
                  > >
                  > > Got it?
                  > >
                  > Not really.

                  OK...

                  >
                  > „without her man” cannot be a clause. A clause should contain a sub
                  > ject and a
                  > verb.

                  Those are finite clauses. There are also non-finite clauses.

                  The fact that what we have here is a non-finite clause in abbreviation shows up
                  when you start to translate it into more grammatically rigorous languages (and
                  no, I don't mean Danish!) You then have to paraphrase the thing as
                  saying "Woman, she being without her man, is nothing".

                  > To me it looks like a prepositional phrase which is post-modifying a noun
                  >
                  > phrase (woman).

                  Syntactically speaking, you are not wrong, but the one does not exclude the
                  other. I could also say that I see it as an adverbial phrase of manner or
                  place, and this would only be a question of interpretation.

                  By qualifying the noun you are implying "Woman, she who is without her man, is
                  nothing", whereas by suggesting it is adverbial I am saying "Woman, when she is
                  without her man, is nothing", which is have less of a negative connotation than
                  your version.



                  > Maybe I should join your Saturday morning English lessons!

                  You'd be the only one. Everyone else invited called off. I ought by now to be
                  used to the fact that the internet - especially in this country - is full of
                  non-serious people who 9 times out of 10 are insincere when they ask for
                  anything in real life. Mainly it is the whim of the moment. When it comes to
                  the "konkrety", then what we hear is "juz nie aktualne". Which is Polish
                  for "It's OK, I was just jerking you around for kicks".
                  • hardenfelt Re: To non-finity and beyond! 31.03.06, 12:00
                    David wrote:
                    The fact that what we have here is a non-finite clause in abbreviation shows up
                    >
                    > when you start to translate it into more grammatically rigorous languages
                    (and
                    > no, I don't mean Danish!) You then have to paraphrase the thing as
                    > saying "Woman, she being without her man, is nothing".

                    Ok - I accept your interpretation. You're probably right. But should I ever
                    need this sentence I will still write: "Woman without her man is nothing", even
                    if it may be wrong. I just don't like too many brakes.
        • shuviniah Re: I ll teach u Polish 26.03.06, 06:27
          "I just hope the scholarship was in one of the non-literary subjects"

          well, I dont wanna teach u English so relax. I do not expect my English teacher
          to speak Polish, he should be just a native speaker. so give me a break. if u
          have a problem try to solve it in other way.
          • russh Re: I ll teach u Polish 26.03.06, 10:36
            Hey, don't worry (normally I'd have to save be happy, but you let someone else
            say that nowadays).

            It's only been a little tease, mainly because you set yourself up for it by
            saying your English was to a certain level.

            Welcome to the Forum, and if you can live with a huge variety of different
            opinions I am sure you will enjoy your stay.

            I think that I am the only one here that cannot speak Polish, so maybe I'll take
            yuo up on your offer someday.
            • usenetposts Re: I ll teach u Polish 26.03.06, 14:50
              russh napisał:

              > Hey, don't worry (normally I'd have to save be happy, but you let someone else
              > say that nowadays).
              >
              > It's only been a little tease, mainly because you set yourself up for it by
              > saying your English was to a certain level.

              Yeah. I'm only pulling your leg, young lady. Don't take it bad.
          • usenetposts Re: I ll teach u Polish 26.03.06, 14:48
            shuviniah napisała:

            > "I just hope the scholarship was in one of the non-literary subjects"
            >
            > well, I dont wanna teach u English so relax. I do not expect my English
            teacher
            > to speak Polish, he should be just a native speaker. so give me a break. if u
            > have a problem try to solve it in other way.

            OK. Point taken. I'll solve my problems in ANother way (note correct
            expression).
            • nasza_maggie Re: I ll teach u Polish 26.03.06, 14:52
              C'mon give her a break.
              She's only trying to do something useful.

              Besides I do remember you guys getting a tad uptight, when someone corrected
              you.
              The argument was that when you can't find any other arguments, picking on how
              somebody writes or makes mistakes is a bit sillywink

              I make mistakes all the time.
              • usenetposts Re: I ll teach u Polish 26.03.06, 14:54
                nasza_maggie napisała:

                > C'mon give her a break.
                > She's only trying to do something useful.
                >
                > Besides I do remember you guys getting a tad uptight, when someone corrected
                > you.
                > The argument was that when you can't find any other arguments, picking on how
                > somebody writes or makes mistakes is a bit sillywink
                >
                > I make mistakes all the time.
                >

                Sure I'll give her a break, but she did come in on such a way as to try and set
                up a certain authority "I'll teach you"...

                OK, I gave her a little initiation ceremony, but I'm quite happy to call it
                quits now.
    • yoric Re: I ll teach u Polish 26.03.06, 16:40
      Our teasing might have been a bit too harsh...

      To be honest, I find the note to be quite easy to understand - and also
      punctuated quite correctly! If it was messy or funny it was due to the
      succinctness.
      But still no mach for article titles on BBC news (e.g. 'Murphy beaten in China'
      [in a snooker tournament] or 'Squid grabs London visitors' [...the attention
      of]). Btw - I thik they do it intentionally.
      • usenetposts Re: I ll teach u Polish 26.03.06, 16:49
        yoric napisał:

        > Our teasing might have been a bit too harsh...
        >
        > To be honest, I find the note to be quite easy to understand - and also
        > punctuated quite correctly! If it was messy or funny it was due to the
        > succinctness.
        > But still no mach for article titles on BBC news (e.g. 'Murphy beaten in
        China'
        > [in a snooker tournament] or 'Squid grabs London visitors' [...the attention
        > of]). Btw - I thik they do it intentionally.

        Oh, they usually do, but a lot of people on the Beeb haven't got a clue about
        English these days either. Things aren't what they used to be.

        By the way, as one Wikipedian to another, I just added an intro to this piece.
        Would you care to give it the once over?

        en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polish_car_number_plates
        • yoric Re: Wikipedia 26.03.06, 17:31
          All I can say is it's truly impressive, but I'm afraid I simply don't know
          enough about the subject to have any comments (apart from the one above).
          • shuviniah Re: Wikipedia 26.03.06, 18:30
            ok peace. if my English is so bad, maybe sb wants to become my exchange language
            partner, no money included. to be honest that was my goal, to find maybe an
            Erasmus student, who wants to learn Polish and improves my English or French.i
            feel a bit hmm... battered, but well, maybe I needed thatsmile and by the way,
            cograts for the forum! I m impressed - it s so "alive"smile
            • usenetposts Re: Wikipedia 26.03.06, 18:48
              shuviniah napisała:

              > ok peace. if my English is so bad, maybe sb wants to become my exchange
              languag
              > e
              > partner, no money included. to be honest that was my goal, to find maybe an
              > Erasmus student, who wants to learn Polish and improves my English or French.i
              > feel a bit hmm... battered, but well, maybe I needed thatsmile and by the way,
              > cograts for the forum! I m impressed - it s so "alive"smile

              OK, if you want to improve your English you can come and see me when the other
              person does, whom I'm helping. That's Saturday mornings. It's strictly English
              only.

              I'm not charging anything for conversation. It's just like an extension of my
              on-line stuff. I make a living doing something else.
                  • ejmarkow Re: Wikipedia 26.03.06, 21:42
                    Dave,

                    That piece on the 'Polish Car Number Plates' on wikipedia is incredible. Is
                    that all your work, the maps and all? Or, is the introduction yours only?

                    Cheers,

                    Eugene
                    • usenetposts Re: Wikipedia 28.03.06, 00:44
                      ejmarkow napisał:

                      > Dave,
                      >
                      > That piece on the 'Polish Car Number Plates' on wikipedia is incredible. Is
                      > that all your work, the maps and all? Or, is the introduction yours only?
                      >
                      > Cheers,
                      >
                      > Eugene

                      Only the intro was mine. I thought the article with the maps and everything was
                      fantastic, but just assumed a bit of prior knowledge. It kind of went straight
                      in at the deep end. That's why I added that first section, but I am hoping to
                      hear honestly whether it adds something or just detracts from the works in
                      place.

                      In fact about 15 Wikipedians have worked on that article, in total.
    • alapacz Re: I ll teach u Polish 03.04.06, 11:42
      Hm, when I've found this forum I thought it was a place when foreigners come
      and help each other to 'survive' wink in this strange country. I also thought
      that when somebody come and offer a kind of service that may be interested for
      you like teaching Polish, it is appreciated. If you don't like her service you
      should just leave it and find another more interesting post. but
      you "zmieszaliscie ją z błotem" somehow sad. It's not nice for somebody who
      visits this forum for the first time. Sorry for all grammar, spelling and
      punctuation mistakes ;D.

      pozdrawiam,

      Agi
      • usenetposts Re: I ll teach u Polish 04.04.06, 18:48
        alapacz napisała:

        > Hm, when I've found this forum I thought it was a place when foreigners come
        > and help each other to 'survive' wink in this strange country. I also thought
        > that when somebody come and offer a kind of service that may be interested
        for
        > you like teaching Polish, it is appreciated. If you don't like her service
        you
        > should just leave it and find another more interesting post. but
        > you "zmieszaliscie ją z błotem" somehow sad. It's not nice for somebody who
        > visits this forum for the first time. Sorry for all grammar, spelling and
        > punctuation mistakes ;D.
        >
        > pozdrawiam,
        >
        > Agi

        We said we were only teasing, so don't get your knickers in a twist. If she had
        taken care not to look too big for her boots in the intro, then nobody would
        have said anything. She seemed to assume that we needed to be taught Polish,
        whereas she didn't need to be taught any English. If it is not offensive to
        come and tell people that you will teach them Polish, then it is also not
        offensive to tell them back that you will teach them English.

        And yet, somehow, it was all right to come and tell us that we needed to be
        taught Polish but not alright to show her that she could still be taught a but
        of English.

        What is wrong with you people and your double standards?

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