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why chips, not fries?

25.09.06, 18:56
in CAN and US people always say "fries"
but it's "fish and chips" not "fish and fries"
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    • chickenbaby Re: why chips, not fries? 25.09.06, 20:12
      ontarian napisał:

      > in CAN and US people always say "fries"
      > but it's "fish and chips" not "fish and fries"

      There is slightly deference between fries and chips though. Fries are thin like
      in McD, instead chips are more like potato wedges.
      • ontarian Re: why chips, not fries? 25.09.06, 20:56
        well, I haven't noticed any difference
        in fries and chips
        not all fries are thin
        even in a supermarket
        when I go to a frozen section
        I see different sizes of fries
        potato wedges are simply potato wedges
      • waldek.usa why english, not polish 26.09.06, 17:03
        chickenbaby napisał:

        >
        > There is slightly deference between fries and chips though. Fries are thin
        like in McD, instead chips are more like potato wedges.



        slightly (like in 'slightly wrong')

        Pronunciation: 'de-f&-r&n(t)s, 'def-r&n(t)s
        Function: noun
        : respect and esteem due a superior or an elder; also : affected or
        ingratiating regard for another's wishes
        synonym see HONOR
        - in deference to : in consideration of <returned early in deference to her
        parents' wishes>

        in McD??? at McD...
    • hanula Re: why chips, not fries? 25.09.06, 23:08
      I guess it's because "fish and chips" has been adopted into American English from Br English as a whole idiomatic phrase (together with the dish itself).

      Similarly, despite the fact that it's supposed to be "biscuits" in BrE and "cookies" in AmE, you will find "chocolate chip cookies" in British supermarkets. They are a typically American invention and as such have retained their original name.

      As far as the difference between "fries" and "chips" in British English goes: yes, "fries" are thin and "chips" are thick. "Potato wedges" are different in that they are shaped like, surprise surprise, wedges, and typically have skin on, whereas chips (and fries) normally don't.
      • chickenbaby Re: why chips, not fries? 26.09.06, 15:28
        Above all, there is a British term for American "French Fries" (even though
        they really come from Belgium!) which describes the thin cut, more processed
        potato fries from i.e McD's or Burger King and other fast food outlets, home-
        fried, or shop bought "oven" fries. This term is ... yes - FRIES!!!
        On the other hand-British "Chips", bought mostly in the traditional chip
        shop ,are deep fried in vats of oil with salt & vinegar, greasy and
        fat,terribly unhealthy, don't appear to exist outside UK and Ireland.What
        Americans call "chips" or "potato chips" are called "crisps" in Britain.
        • hanula Re: why chips, not fries? 26.09.06, 20:05
          > On the other hand-British "Chips", bought mostly in the traditional chip
          > shop ,are deep fried in vats of oil with salt & vinegar, greasy and
          > fat

          You should have tried sources other than cheap takeaways! Freshly fried chips in a good British restaurant are excellent. And they are not always served with vinegar. After all, chips are not just served with battered fish (and therefore lemon or vinegar) but are also the traditional side dish for steaks.
          • steph13 Re: why chips, not fries? 26.09.06, 22:15
            Well, British chips do not have to be deep fried in vats of fat - they can be
            easily oven baked too. Or even home made to boot. And outside MacDonalds or
            Burger King you wouldn't call them 'fries' for love nor money. Logically, they
            really are 'chips' or strips of potato and it's the American version that
            implies frying as preferred method of preparation.
      • ontarian Re: why chips, not fries? 26.09.06, 17:53
        hanula napisała:

        > I guess it's because "fish and chips" has been adopted into American English
        fr
        > om Br English as a whole idiomatic phrase (together with the dish itself).
        to jest w sumie najbardziej przekonywujace
    • karul ludzie, przeciez 30.09.06, 04:31
      musza byc jakies roznice miedzy BrE i AmE. po co ta dyskusja?

      a co do "fish and chips". raz do roku ogarnia mnie nostalgia za takim daniem,
      ide wtedy do jednego z kanadyjskich "F&C places" i zjadam porcje. zaraz potem
      rozumiem, dlaczego nie jadlem tego przez rok - cale to nasycone tluszczem danie
      siedzi potem w zoladku przez pare godzin, powodujac nieprzyjemne wrazenia.

      juz lepiej zjesc polskiego schabowego, ktory tez bardzo niezdrowy.
      • venus22 Re: ludzie, przeciez 30.09.06, 09:49
        a ja bardzo lubie F&C ale kupuje w miejscach gdzie wiem ze maja swieze i
        zawsze zamawiam do domu, plus coleslow,
        w tym czasie caly ten tluszcz obcieka w gazete. gazeta do pakowania to
        obowiazkowo!
        (pod gazeta jest czysty papier do "fudu")
        zjadam i jest super!!


        Venus
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